Talk:Distributed Component Object Model

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Microsoft Controversy[edit]

I remember reading up into DCE several years ago, I found a lot of accusations on the web that Microsoft "hijacked" a lot of code from DCE/RPC in "MSRPC" MSRPC is derived from the DCE 1.1 reference implementation, but has been copyrighted by Microsoft. None of the UNIX vendors at the time wanted to implement DCE/RPC it at the time.

Later on, DCOM would be 'donated' by MicroSoft to the Open Group as a marketing stunt. The "D" to COM was due to extensive use of DCE/RPC – more specifically Microsoft's enhanced version, known as MSRPC. However, DCOM is pretty worthless without a bunch of application-level class libraries, such as ODBC, OLE DB, ADO, and ASP to run on top of it. Microsoft never released these specifications to the public, so these technologies have never been available for Unix. DCOM was 'donated' to Open Group as a marketing stunt.


Shouldn't this issue be addressed somewhere?

Sure - with the appropriate references, that would make a great addition to this article. Merenta (talk) 20:26, 27 April 2008 (UTC)

DCOM is not depreciated in favor of .Net[edit]

Apprently the .NET CLR is a DCOM object, refering to Windows Internals fifth edition, so how come .Net depreciate COM? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Bibo1978 (talkcontribs) 08:28, 3 March 2010 (UTC)