Talk:District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871

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Untitled[edit]

I don't exactly know what else to say, so it could use some expanding.--Joseph Leito 16:34, 8 November 2007 (UTC)

Those who say this act was not significant in regards to "Corp US"[edit]

The article states: "...Others however, believe that it does not, only setting a corporation of the District of Columbia."

If people are responding to the Corp US scenario with the above, it's worth pointing out that corporations can hold jurisdiction beyond their boundaries through the rule of contract. Throughout our life, we contract with the government institution. If the government we contract with is the corporate government, where it resides is of no significance, as a contract is a contract, and those who sign are subject to the terms and conditions laid out in the contract.

THAT is how the DC, Corporate government can gain control over individuals - by LEGALLY subjecting them to their terms and conditions under contract and commercial law, yet never requiring the subject/citizen to reside within their geographical jurisdicition.

Any thoughts? Am I talking complete bullshit? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.221.40.3 (talk) 14:15, 3 January 2008 (UTC)


No. This is not bull at all. This act destroyed citizens sovereignty. The Federal Corporation doesn't represent "the People." In fact, these people have change the laws to make corporations people because the Federal corporation is, for, and by corporations. In fact, our Constitution is called the Incorporation Constitution because it's the corporate version, not the original. They've been trying to push the incorporated constitution into the states and it's been accomplished only piece meal so far.

76.226.26.208 (talk) 22:35, 20 March 2011 (UTC)

Washington or District[edit]

The Act of Congress of 1871 states

this portion of said District, included within the present limits of the city of Washington shall continue to be known as the city of Washington

The period about the city name has been modified without consensus, and I suppose it must be restored as it was Jalo 14:14, 2 February 2009 (UTC)


Change in importance[edit]

Given that this Act COMPLETELY CHANGED our system of government into a corporate governing body, treasonously, understanding this act should be of critical importance. This system enabled the corporate/admiralty law statutory court system to rule us as opposed to the common law courts, now called petit and grand juries

Javalizard (talk) 22:43, 20 March 2011 (UTC)

Given that nothing of the sort is even remotely true, and Wikipedia is not a compilation of crazy conspiracy theories, no. It should not be considered "of critical importance." 75.76.213.161 (talk) 22:56, 25 April 2014 (UTC)