Talk:Diyu

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Jigoku[edit]

Does anyone know exactly how the Ji in Jigoku got changed to a 2 when referring to it with the numbers 259? 171.66.188.90 22:20, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

It's a play on sounds. "Ji" is an alternate reading for two, as in the slightly unusual spelling for the boys name Jiro 二郎. Thus, with the alternate reading for 2, one get ji-go-ku (the "ku" is also an alternate reading for 9, which is more commonly "kyu"), and the number 259 becomes unlucky, and Highway 259 becomes the Japanese "Highway to Hell". Boneyard90 (talk) 21:10, 13 May 2011 (UTC)

Feng Du Discussion[edit]

The following is the original discussion retained from "Feng Du" version of this page: RandomCritic 13:56, 6 May 2006 (UTC)

I have never heard of Feng Du as the realm of death in any Chinese mythology. Doing a google search on the name only turns out one reference which was basically the source of this article. On the other hand, 豐都 is a ghost town in China that turns into a tourist attraction recently. So from a ghost town to a realm of the death is a big jump. I hope some scholars can add some more details to this article. Kowloonese 22:36, 11 Jun 2004 (UTC)

You are quite right . My Mother never told me stories of Feng Du.-Narcrissa

I am not talking about what my mom told me. My mom knows little compared to what I know now. I am talking about lack of any reference from Google. The only google-able reference is the same reference this article is based on. This wikipedia often based on fictional information created by game software company (see most of the articles about the characters from the three kingdoms, a lot were just cut and paste from the on-line help of some PC game with a similar title). I really question the validity of this article. Can someone who know other source to this topic please post the information? At least provide the Chinese text for the term "Feng Du" so that we can consult some Chinese references. I posted the question almost a year ago and yet there is no additional info. I would vote for a deletion of this article if nothing come up soon. Kowloonese 00:15, Mar 12, 2005 (UTC)

There are many Chinese terminologies related to Hell. For example, 地府, 黃泉, 陰間, 陰司, 陰府, 重泉, 泉路, 幽冥, 幽壤, 九原, 九泉, 森羅殿 or 閻羅殿, 地獄, 奈何橋, 三塗 (Budd. 火塗,刀塗,血塗), 阿鼻 *[a1bi2], n., (Budd.) the hell of uninterrupted torture, last and deepest of eight hot hells (from Sanskr. avici), 足跟, 火炕, 望鄉臺, 油鍋, 九幽, etc. None of these sounds like Feng Du. Kowloonese 00:28, Mar 12, 2005 (UTC)

I was able to find 酆都城 on Google which is what this title is about. Kowloonese 23:01, 13 December 2005 (UTC)

The "Feng Du" name and information seem to have been extracted from the "Godchecker" pages, which on scrutiny appear to be about as reliable a source as Deities and Demigods. RandomCritic 14:45, 6 May 2006 (UTC)
It is mentionned in texts of the taoist Shanqing school. In the course of a meditation-visualisation seance, the shangqing adept travels in a number of realms including hell which is named fengdu, after a Zhou city. See Isabelle Robinet in "Taoism: Growth of a Religion". 218.166.78.43 06:27, 9 July 2006 (UTC)

Copied discussion[edit]

Following talk copied from 18 Levels of Hell page: RandomCritic 13:56, 6 May 2006 (UTC)

Would it be more precise to change the first sentence to "In Taoist and Chinese Buddhist mythology ..."? I don't know that this particular conception of hell/purgatory is found in e.g. Indian Buddhism.

Verification.[edit]

None of these chambers seem to get any Google hits beyond this page and its mirrors. They all seem to have been added by one editor and have been barely edited since then. Can someone verify that these are from actual mythology, and if so, can they identify some of the specific myths and writings they're mentioned in so we can note them in the article? --Aquillion 02:17, 15 April 2006 (UTC)

I know the "Transformationa Text of Mahamaudgalyayana, One Scroll" written on the 16th day of gthe fourth month in the seventh year of the True Brightness reign-period by Hsueh An-chun, lay student at the Pure Land Monastery mentions Avici hell as the lowest level. Mahamaudgalyayana has an Indian origin, but he also has the Chinese name of Mulian 156.143.72.97 04:24, 1 May 2006 (UTC) Katie Barnhill

many opinions[edit]

While various descriptions of hell are to be found in chinese documents, Chinese people don’t typically attend religious classes where they would be taught exactly what to expect in the afterlife. Books about chinese religion generally maintain that the original chinese hell was not a Purgatory, but just an Otherworld very similar to the world we know, where ghosts bad and good go to live all together, hence the custom to send commodities and goods to your loved ones by burning paper effigies. Law and order are maintained the way they are on earth by the underworld administration. The elaborate punishment-purification hell seems to come from buddhism, but when taoists adopted the concept they changed the number of hells, the names of hell kings and some other aspects. There is a mix of influences and most probably different versions exist..If you read chinese, try a 知識+ (yahoo members mutual assistance) search with the differents terms on Chinese yahoo. 218.166.85.146 12:45, 3 June 2006 (UTC)

Also you have to assign a religion or a more specific group to that certain view of hell, not all chinese believe that specific insight to hell/the afterlife C.Allen 13:24, 21 September 2006 (UTC)

popular culture[edit]

i'd think journey to the west should be included, at the start, it has the full description of Di Yu as the king was taken for a tour of it, including the 18 levels of hell. Yiyun 12:19, 7 September 2006 (UTC)

This article should be renamed Diyu[edit]

Diyu is one word, not Di Yu. I can't believe that so many people still do not realize that Hanyu Pinyin has orthographic rules, you don't space each syllable. --Mamin27 22:35, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

The dark course[edit]

I just updated the Meido (disambiguation) page to point to here, based on [1]'s definition of 冥途 (míngtú) or 冥土 (meido). If someone a little more familiar with the subject could incorporate a mention here, that'd be great. Thanks. -- JHunterJ 01:07, 24 September 2007 (UTC)

間地獄經 doesn't even exist[edit]

Can anyone find that so-called canon? I can't find it in cbeta.Tricia Takanawa (talk) 01:08, 20 March 2009 (UTC)

It is the 問地獄經.漢魏六朝佛教之「地獄」說(上) Einstein Li 37 (talk) 11:01, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

{{clarifyme}}?[edit]

"Chamber of Avici – Crooks who have committed heinous crimes, brought misery to the people and betrayed the ruler are placed on a platform above an inferno. The unlucky ones fall off the platform into the inferno and burn while the lucky ones remain on the platform. These spirits are never to be reincarnated." Is that misery & betrayal both, or 1 each? And which souls aren't reincarnated, the ones on the platform, the ones in the inferno, or all of them? (I'm also troubled "crooks" is a bit unencyclopedic.)

BTW, this is coming back dead link. TREKphiler hit me ♠ 05:32 & 05:38, 29 July 2009 (UTC)

Coherence[edit]

The article doesn't read coherently. It's like a collection of random bits of information, inserted at random by different editors over time. I'll attempt to string everything together and improve the flow. Anyone interested in helping me? _LDS (talk) 15:19, 15 March 2010 (UTC)