Talk:Dom Pérignon (wine)

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prestige cuvée?[edit]

In the History section, it says "Dom Pérignon was the first prestige cuvée". On the page for Cristal (wine), in this history section, it says that Cristal "is viewed by many as the first prestige cuvée" citing this source: [1]. A clarification may need to be made. Sunshine Patriot (talk) 02:47, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

I don't have my own independent knowledge on this issue, and I haven't tracked down other sources, but reading both articles it seems that Cristal was the first prestige cuvée to be made (in 1876) but it wasn't sold commercially until 1945. Dom Pérignon was first made in 1921. The article is a little unclear or contradictory about when it was first sold. The article says Dom Pérignon was "was only released for sale in 1936", but it also says "The first buyers of Dom Pérignon 1921 were 150 customers of Simon Bros & Co, the company that imported Moët in the United Kingdom, which ordered the first 300 bottles.". Perhaps it was available in special batches in 1921 and was more widely sold in 1936, either way it was sold to the general public before Cristal. twfowler (talk) 15:33, 20 July 2010 (UTC)
It is not contradictory (although perhaps unclear if you thought it contradictory); 1921 was the first vintage released to the public and it was released to the public in 1936. The current release of Dom Pérignon, in 2011, is the 2002 vintage. — Preceding unsigned comment added by The.xtype (talkcontribs) 02:42, 8 December 2011 (UTC)

James Bond[edit]

I don't think it's necessary to have that remark about james bond Paskari 17:26, 1 December 2006 (UTC)

A Bond-related side issue: in the 1967 film of On Her Majesty's Secret Service, George Lazenby as James Bond orders a "Dom Pérignon '57". According to this site, there was no 1957 vintage. All the other vintages Bond orders throughout the film series (collated by some enthusiast here) are genuine. Opera hat (talk) 20:59, 8 July 2008 (UTC)

history of sparkling wine[edit]

The 'evidence' of sparkling wine being first discovered in Britain is misleading and that line should be clarified. Wine was not usually bottled at source back then, and the bottles that became sparkling were still French wines from Champagne that were being bottled carelessly in Britain. Simultaneously, other producers were in Champagne were also finding that their wines were becoming sparkling, and Dom Perignon's original mission was to try and prevent Champagne wines from becoming sparkling. To describe how sparkling wines were first discovered, there needs to be detailed explanation of the climate and choice of grape varieties being used in Champagne, the cold temperatures and stop ferments and then subsequent warming up and mishandling of the wines, as well as the role played by the discovery of cork bark-based stoppers and improved methods of producing glass bottles. If I get the chance I will attempt to correct these mistakes myself.

The whole article really needs improving; it is not up to scratch. I recommend reading the changes I made to the Champagne Krug article, and trying to bring it up to that standard. Terroiriste 12:34, 19 December 2006 (UTC)

Moët et Chandon[edit]

As Dom Pérignon is the luxury cuvée of Moët et Chandon, would it not make more sense for this to be combined with the Moët et Chandon page? If I recall correctly, the first vintage of Dom Pérignon Rosé was shipped to the Shah of Iran. There is also the cuvée oenethelique which are older releases of Dom Perignon. I do not know whether these are recently disgorged or not.Fmh1964 18:07, 24 June 2007 (UTC)

I think the notability of the wine alone makes it worthwhile to have its own page with a link to the Moet et Chandon page. It is similar to the Ford Mustang having its own article apart from Ford Motor Company or the iPod article being separate from Apple Inc. AgneCheese/Wine 21:56, 24 June 2007 (UTC)

Maturation Age[edit]

I actually visited Epernay in France and saw the company's cellars, and I do believe the champagne "specialist" there said that the age of maturation for all dom perignon vintage wines is 12 years. 12 months is nothing, and won't even ferment the grapes. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Aakashsur (talkcontribs) 06:28, 6 September 2009 (UTC)

Years[edit]

Dom Perignon has been produced in 39 years (not in 38). Non-rose vintages have been produced in 38 years and 1986 Rose vintage was not paired with a non-Rose one thus making total of 39 years. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Niklarin (talkcontribs) 06:48, 2 January 2013 (UTC)