Talk:Domain parking

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Why would a school network block this kind of site? I would like it if this answere could be included in the article. Is it Damaging to a network system? Does it slow down the A Network Browser? Ian.Lahlum 19:32, 13 December 2006 (UTC)Ian.L

Because it's just ads and serves no purpose to the end user. -Indolences 00:11, 19 February 2007 (UTC)

As the answer to the above question. I think the problem is not the advertising. Redirection is a normal method used by a lot of websites including adult websites. some administrators prefere to block all redirections pessimistically. Some browsers also stop redirections in their default settings. that may be the case there too. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 60.241.1.247 (talk) 06:11, 2 September 2007 (UTC)


Some information that I believe is missing from this page, is how search engines see parked domains. If one website has two domains pointed towards it(one parked, and one normal), can search engines detect which one is the parked one and which one is the "normal" domain? Ashton.Sanders (talk) 00:49, 8 August 2008 (UTC)

NPOV[edit]

This article tries to promote domain parking as a positive thing, using marketing speak and without mentioning the problems it causes. Towel401 (talk) 00:00, 28 June 2008 (UTC)

I make my living in the domain name industry and the article seems pretty fair to me. Saying parking is good or bad is an opinion which would need to be backed up by facts -- facts which would be difficult to support conclusively either way. Parked domains may display advertisements that a user may find interesting, especially if the owner of the domain name takes the time to target his ads to his audience. Similarly, parked domains may provide revenue for a webmaster which he can then use to better develop it at a later date.

Downside of what some people do with parking is also obvious -- not ever planning to use the domains for any purpose other than to serve up advertisements on them. Reece111 (talk) 16:51, 7 December 2008 (UTC)

It's called "Domaining", not "Domaineering"... Can someone please correct that -- I just did a couple days ago and someone changed it back for reasons unbeknownst to me. Reece111 (talk) 13:21, 9 December 2008 (UTC)

I agree about this article making Domain Parking look like something good when it's not. Personally, I think domain parking is kind of in the same category as Spam (electronic). Are there any reputable sources that discuss possible ways to curb domain parking? Cazort (talk) 17:27, 15 December 2008 (UTC)

To characterize domain parking as "good" or "bad" is akin to calling billboard, radio or tv advertising "good" or "bad". If the ads convert into sales, then from the advertisers perspective the medium is worth paying for. Obviously, the consumer benefited as well as they saw something they liked and bought. Domain advertising works well enough or the market mechanism would have dumped it as being non-profitable long ago. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.243.182.162 (talk) 09:10, 23 March 2009 (UTC)

This article defining domaineering is clear, well balanced and accurate. The article portrays domaineering as a form of advertising and domaining more as speculating on domain names. The article doesn't make either domaineering or domaining look good or bad, it just shows the difference between the two and explains how they use domain parking differently. The article is fair, informative and enlightening about domaineering. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.210.160.196 (talk) 19:47, 15 April 2009 (UTC)


There is no such thing as "Domaineering", the word is never used within the industry or by people involved in any domain names monetization related activities. Domaining is only proper word for it. It should be neither negative or positive, but simply the description of the business.

It's also not up to wikipedia to decide if parking is "good" or "bad", neutral point of view should be adhered according to the editing guidelines. Lysimachos (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 00:02, 18 April 2009 (UTC).

If a parked domain doesn't bring in the revenue, domaineers typically quickly drop it and it becomes available for someone else to use as they see fit. The parked domain names that are renewed are therefore presumably commercially viable for domaineering. Take the generic domain name: toothpaste dot com. Isn't that generic domain name being used as an advertising vehicle? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.246.190.74 (talk) 07:14, 31 May 2009 (UTC)


Someone named OhNoitsJamie deleted links that were useful to someone reading the article. They were not spam. They were 1) a link to give an example of what a Parked Domain is, which is something that is very germane to the idea of even having this article (so that someone not certain would have a firsthand example what a Parked Domain looks like), and 2) a link that is useful to the broad community of users who would be interested in removing Parked Domain results from their Google, Yahoo, or other searches. Not a bit of the two links I added I think could really be considered as advertisement/spam. This was purely informational and an aid to readers. Steve Sybesma (ssybesma), Lafayette, CO —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ssybesma (talkcontribs) 04:47, 30 June 2009 (UTC)

This article doesn't mention cyberspeculation, which is the primary use of domain parking: Speculators buy the names in hopes of being able to resell them later to organizations that need a domain. They routinely expect 4 figures for .org domains, and 5 or 6 figures for .coms. This is akin to cybersquatting in its deleterious effects on consumers (like spam) but is not illegal because it is a preemptive act rather than an example of trademark infringement. It still represents a purely parasitic practice because it raises the costs to consumers (by increasing overhead of service providers) without providing them any benefit whatsoever. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.176.60.220 (talk) 23:04, 11 May 2014 (UTC)

Professor William Lorenz and the importance of sources/links[edit]