Talk:Donatism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Christianity / Catholicism (Rated Start-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Christianity, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Christianity on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Catholicism (marked as High-importance).
 
WikiProject Religion (Rated Start-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Religion, a project to improve Wikipedia's articles on Religion-related subjects. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the wikiproject page for more details.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Africa (Rated Start-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Africa, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Africa on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Catholic[edit]

I remove the word 'Catholic' from the article because this took place long before the Great Schism. Catholic isn't necessarily the wrong word to use, but Orthodox could be used just as accurately. Rather than intermix the two, it seems easiest to distinguish between Donatism and the rest of Christianity for purposes of this discussion. Wesley 21:55 Nov 6, 2002 (UTC)

I see Wesley's explanation for removing the word 'Catholic'. I think that is a mistake. Yes, 'Orthodox' is equally accurate here, and neither Catholic nor Orthodox will object to the use of either word. But removing both _fails_ to accurately distinguish between Donatism and the rest of Christianity, because there were already other significant groups that were not Catholic (in any sense of the word), yet claimed to be the Christian Church.

But I am more concerned about the misuse of the word 'heresy' in this article. Neither the Roman Catholic Church, nor the Orthodox Church, ever classified the Donatists as _heretics_. They were always classified as schismatics, except for the decree of the Emperor Honorius, which really has no weight in the matter.

Actually, the Donatists were considered heretics, since their *doctrines* went contrary to orthodox Catholic Christianity. Naturally, they were also schismatics. Also, there were no "Donatist Popes of Rome"; if there were, we should see documentation of it. The Popes of Rome have always been orthodox Catholic.
I changed the term "heresy" to "sect," which is more accurate and less POV. It is also the word the Roman Catholic Church itself uses to describe Donatism.

=modern meaning of the word[edit]

Today, "Donatism" is the belief (labeled a heresy by the Catholic Church) that a corrupt priest cannot administer a sacrament. This modern day meaning should be put in a prominent place in the article, which is good as far as it goes but tells us only history.24.44.252.192 (talk) 19:43, 17 August 2013 (UTC)captcrisis

Catholic is not unreasonable here, but linking it to "Roman_Catholic_Church" is misleading and anachronistic. --Haruo 20:30, 27 September 2006 (UTC)
Perhaps using "catholic" (small C) here would work best, as that might get across how they were outside of the Christian mainstream, without referring to the Roman Catholic Church as it became a later institution. It would be using "catholic" more in its sense of "universal," a way that is commonly used in classrooms. Naturally, it would seem prudent to include a word or two to explain this distinction in the article, so as to inform the casual reader. VincentValentine29 22:46, 26 September 2007 (UTC)

Donatist Popes of Rome?[edit]

By what stretch of the imagination are we labeling certain Popes Donatisits? Just because they hailed from North Africa?

succession question[edit]

  • Quote: Outside Africa the Donatists had a bishop residing on the property of an adherent in Spain, and at an early period of the schism they made a bishop for their small congregation in Rome, which met, it seems, on a hill outside the city, and had the name of "Montenses". This antipapal "succession with a beginning" was frequently ridiculed by Catholic writers. The series included Felix, Boniface, Encolpius, Macrobius (c. 370), Lucian, Claudian (c. 378), and again Felix in 411. from New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia webpage. Is this list of names according to Donatist sources? Is this succession plausible? Can anyone verify this info about this...Thanks —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 220.239.133.151 (talkcontribs) .

Article should be Donatism, no?[edit]

For the sake of uniformity I think it would make sense to rewrite the first sentence (e.g.

Donatism was a movement, and system of belief, considered heretical by the Orthodox, or Catholic, Christian churches of the time, which took a less forgiving approach than the other churches to those who had, under persecution, renounced Christ and later sought reacceptance in the church. Donatism was founded by the Berber Christian leader Donatus Magnus—hence the name—and was predominantly centered in North Africa, then a Roman Province. The movement flourished in the fourth and fifth centuries.

or something like that) and to move the article to Donatism, since the various other church movements, orthodox and heterodox alike, are generally covered under the name of the "ism" not the name of the "ist". --Haruo 20:36, 27 September 2006 (UTC)