Talk:Dordrecht

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Unless there is soon an article Dordrecht (South Africa), and all the links to Dordrecht are adjusted, I think I'll revert the move. --Patrick 23:30, 14 Mar 2004 (UTC)

Question[edit]

Is "Thyre" or "Thure" or "Thyredrith" the historical name of that river after which the city is named, and if yes, what is it called today? According to the historical map shown on the page, there is a river but it's called differently, "De Merwede". That's confusing. Fiffififf D. Dünngus (talk) 18:16, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

That river doesn't exist anymore. See also Biesbosch#Creation. Dinsdagskind (talk) —Preceding undated comment was added at 09:38, 5 January 2009 (UTC).

The article should at least be self-consistent. "The name Dordrecht comes from Thyre, the name of a river, and Middle Dutch drecht "ford", meaning "Thure river crossing" is highly confusing. Was it Thyre or Thure? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.113.37.9 (talk) 10:59, 22 September 2011 (UTC)

Places of Interest[edit]

- Dutch 'munt' can mean both coin and mint. In this case 'munt' clearly means mint and should be translated as such. - 'Kyck' in Kyck over den Dyck refers to the view one has over the dike, not the act of looking itself. - The name 'Groothoofdspoort' arguably indicates "the gate at the broad end of the quay". In my opinion, head is not the right translation for 'hoofd' as in end of the quay, but I'm not sure of the right way to translate either. I changed the translation to Big Groyne's Gate but on second thought, that's a bit silly. Anybody any ideas? —Preceding unsigned comment added by SavannahD (talkcontribs) 16:39, 10 October 2009 (UTC)