Talk:Double album

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First double album?[edit]

"1996 2Pac's All Eyes on Me was released as being supposedly the first double rap album to ever be entirely of an original album format".

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=383188 was released in 1993. Lotheric (talk) 10:29, 31 May 2014 (UTC)

Comments[edit]

  1. Is the proper spelling double-album?
  2. Shouldn't the list of double albums be moved to its own article? (For one thing it has the potential to grow very, very long.)

--Gyrofrog (talk) 19:55, 17 August 2005 (UTC)

Considering that many dance music albums are doubles makes the list a little silly IMOSecretlondon 21:59, 29 August 2005 (UTC)
As predicted, this list is already growing quite long. Does anyone have objections to splitting the list from the article? -- Gyrofrog (talk) 18:05, 27 September 2005 (UTC)
I'm fine with either way; if the best thing to do is split the list from the article then I say go for it :) Cjmarsicano 04:33, 28 September 2005 (UTC)
Done. See List of double albums. -- Gyrofrog (talk) 06:56, 6 October 2005 (UTC)
It's a great pitty that Leonard Cohen has never made a double album, albeit an album long enough to take up 2 LP, it makes me wonder - given that he is one of the heaviest talents of all time - how many songs he has recorded, that nobody's ever heard because thay were simply thrown off his albums. Some day we will find out, maybe when the Leonard Cohen catalog is reissued on SACD.
[restored from different section]: Should would-have-been double albums such a Death of a Ladies' Man by Leonard Cohen be added to this article.


Were the Guns N' Roses Use Your Illusion discs truly a double album, or the simultaneous release of two separately sold albums? Perhaps a note could be made of this practice; Bruce Springsteen's Human Touch and Lucky Town are another example of simultaneous, but separate, album releases. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.191.191.153 (talk) 04:14, 23 March 2008 (UTC)

Best selling double album[edit]

What is the best-selling double album of all time? Is it still Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness? 71.65.54.92 00:09, 2 November 2005 (UTC)

The Beatles White album was when it came out, but was later topped by Saturday Night Fever.

Double LP Side Order[edit]

Why do some double albums mix up their side orders? For example LP 1 has side 1 and side 4 on it, while LP 2 has side 2 and side 3 on it? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.22.231.53 (talkcontribs) 03:44, 27 November 2005 (UTC)

Short answer: the listener only had to get up once to flip both records over. Now the long version; it's the train of thought off the top of my head. (If someone can put this more succinctly, it's definitely worth mentioning in the article - and thanks for bringing it up!) It has to do with the way some turntables were constructed. Many models had a tall spindle in the center with a little latch at the top. The listener could place several records, one on top of the other, on the spindle. When one side of one record finished, the tone arm would move out of the way, then the next record would drop, and playback would resume. (In hindsight this may not have been very good for the records.) Double albums were sometimes made with sides 1 & 4 on one disc, and sides 2 & 3 on the other. This way, after side 1 finished, the next record would drop and side 2 would play. When side 2 finished, the listener could pick up both records at the same time, flip both of them over and then 3 and 4 would play in that order. -- Gyrofrog (talk) 04:02, 27 November 2005 (UTC)

Kid Rock[edit]

This probably isn't worth mentioning in the article, but I thought I'd share it here. I've never really listened to Kid Rock, so I don't really have any opinion of him to speak of. But one thing I thought was really cool was his idea for a tripple album (which he didn't end up making): The three CDs would be named, in order, "Kid" "Fucking" "Rock:. The first would have been country, the second hip-hop and the third rock. You have to admit that that's a very cool idea.

Triple albums have been done before. Zazaban (talk) 03:01, 25 July 2009 (UTC)

Albums by length[edit]

As this article discusses more than just double albums, could we move it to albums by length — or similar? jareha (comments) 06:45, 23 May 2006 (UTC)

Do separately released albums count as a double album?[edit]

I was wondering if albums such as Guns N' Roses' Use Your Illusion I and Use Your Illusion II and System of a Down's Mezmerize and Hypnotize count as double albums? If they are not actually double albums, is there a term for them, and should there be mention of them in this article? Joltman 19:27, 31 July 2006 (UTC)

No, IMO, they're not double albums. Double (triple, etc.) albums come in a single package, and those to which you're referring do not. There are several other pairs like that in List of double albums; it's been proposed to move them to a separate article, but nobody's come up with anything good to call them. Maybe "double releases"? <big shrug> — Wwagner 16:05, 11 August 2006 (UTC)

triple album[edit]

the first one of note... All things must pass is from november '70 while the woodstock OST was released in August i believe. but maybe woodstock is a compilation and not suitable as a prototype triple album?

Video Game Soundtracks?[edit]

Video game soundtracks often release using multiple discs. 3-disc game albums are not uncommon, and sometimes there are even albums containing 4 or more discs. For example, the recent Okami Original Soundtrack contains 5 discs of music. Being that it is all from one single game, I don't feel it could be considered a boxset.

Anyway, I was just wondering if this is worth mentioning in this article. --Kaleb.G 22:19, 22 December 2006 (UTC)

Side numbering on double album vinyl records[edit]

This needs to be added to the article (and comes out of my recent edit revision on the Tommy (rock opera) article [1]):
The reason for strange out-of sequence side numbering on double albums was record changers. Most people didn't have single-play turntables, they had changers with a tall central spindle. You stacked the records on the spindle and they would drop down onto the platter one at a time. So a double album (disc one had sides 1 & 4. disc two had sides 2 & 3) would be stacked with side 1 facing up on the bottom and the second disc with side 2 facing up stacked on top of it. Then, when both records had been played and side 2 was done, you flipped the stack of two over as one unit. So now the second disc was now on the bottom, with side 3 facing up, and the first disc with side 4 facing up on the disc on top of that so you would end up playing sides 1,2,3,4 in the proper order. Thomas Dzubin Talk 01:06, 13 March 2007 (UTC)

Best selling[edit]

I thought the best selling double album of all time is Dangerous (album). Article List of best-selling albums worldwide says the same. The Wall is the second. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 217.17.40.66 (talk) 19:18, 20 January 2008 (UTC)

Merge[edit]

Unless anyone has any objections (I can't imagine why since the article is fairly empty), I'm going to merge triple album to this article (which mainly consists of deleting that page into a redirect TheHYPO (talk) 10:36, 21 August 2008 (UTC)

Agree. I'll do the move as there has been no objections. SilkTork *YES! 19:38, 12 December 2008 (UTC)

Obvious NPOV[edit]

From the Critical Reaction section:

"The concept of a double album is one that often sparks critical debate. Some see them as a testament to a band's creativity, and many double albums, such as Bruce Springsteen's The River, Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti and the Rolling Stones' Exile on Main St. were met with great praise upon their release and are now widely considered to be classics. Others received somewhat mixed reviews upon their release, but with the passing of time their reputation has improved.

On the other hand, double albums are often seen as self indulgent and bloated, containing "filler" tracks or old studio out-takes which would not usually be considered of a high enough standard to appear on a single album. In many instances, double albums come at a time in a band's career when they have achieved much success and possibly believe that fans will buy anything they produce."

The part I bolded is the most offending, although the whole section is POV and unsourced. It looks as though someone who's against double albums wrote this. --Crackthewhip775 (talk) 02:06, 2 February 2009 (UTC)

First studio double album[edit]

Blonde on Blonde may have been the first rock double album ever, but what about Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Songbook released in 1956? Does anyone know of an earlier studio double album than that?DrRockzo (talk) 21:49, 30 March 2009 (UTC)

That's not rock, is more like jazz, but the first rock double-album, I think, was 1964 album called The International Battle Of The Century The Beatles vs. The Four Seasons, an early released by Vee-Jay of the the first Beatles' album (Introducing... The Beatles) w/b an album by The Four Seasons.--Julio1017 (talk) 01:56, 4 December 2010 (UTC)


  • internal inconsistency: The article states that there were 6 weeks between releasing Bob Dylan's "Blonde on Blonde" and Zappa's "Freak Out"; however the specific articles for these albums state June 20th and June 27th respectively. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.81.201.186 (talk) 16:44, 10 February 2011 (UTC)

Albums That Span More Than Three Discs[edit]

Can you think of any more? I'm curious...--66.177.73.86 (talk) 22:04, 30 March 2010 (UTC)

another triple album[edit]

Tom Waits' "Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards" for triple albums? — Preceding unsigned comment added by IIIIIIIII (talkcontribs) 21:54, 9 September 2012 (UTC)