Talk:Doubleday (publisher)

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Data for improvements to the Doubleday (publisher) article[edit]

The below is from the History of Doubleday on the website maintained by Random House Inc.

"Doubleday's century of publishing began in 1897 when Frank Nelson Doubleday, with remarkable confidence, and a back loan of five thousand dollars, founded Doubleday &McClure Company in partnership with magazine publisher Samuel McClure. Among their first bestsellers was A Day's Work by Rudyard Kipling. While the alliance between Doubleday and McClure lasted only three years, a long and profitable friendship grew between Doubleday and Kipling, who, using Doubleday's initials, "F.N.D.," nicknamed him "effendi," the Turkish word for "chief"; this name remained with Doubleday for his entire career.

In 1900 the company became Doubleday, Page & Company when Walter Hines Page joined as a new partner. He was a strong coleader until his appointment as U.S. Ambassador to the Court of St. James in 1913. The founder's son, Nelson Doubleday, joined the firm in 1922. Doubleday merged with George H. Doran Company in 1927, making Doubleday, Doran the largest publishing concern in the English-speaking world. The business became known as Doubleday & Company in 1946. Anchor Books created by Jason Epstein in 1953, was the first line of distinguished trade paperback books in the industry. Shortly thereafter a Catholic publishing program was started by John Delaney. By 1955 the program had expanded to cover other religions, which soon led to the Image line of trade paperbacks. This program is still growing today. The Nan A. Talese imprint was formed in 1990, two years after she joined Doubleday, bringing with her a distinguished list of authors.

Doubleday was sold to Bertelsmann, AG, a Germany-based worldwide communications company in 1986. In 1988 it became part of the Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group which went on to acquire and become a division of Random House Inc. in 1998. " --Tony Hecht 06:59, 26 Jun 2005 (UTC) Tony Hecht 01:17, 16 February 2007 (UTC)

Merge from The Crime Club[edit]

see Talk:The Crime Club. :: Kevinalewis : (Talk Page)/(Desk) 13:05, 5 December 2006 (UTC)

The public identity of it as a separate unit from Doubleday is such that it should remain a separate article. I've heard of the Crime Club for 50 years and never knew until recently that it belonged to Doubleday. Hayford Peirce 16:44, 5 December 2006 (UTC)
Agree, no reason to merge. Borisblue 22:32, 14 December 2006 (UTC)

[edit]

The entry for Lord Tyger by Phillip Jose Farmer contains a link to this page, but displays the square root sign. Was this an imprint of Doubleday? Rojomoke (talk) 19:13, 26 October 2008 (UTC)

Length of Summary[edit]

I believe the summary now contains all information needed and have removed the 'too short' notice.sinarau (talk) 23:25, 17 February 2015 (UTC)