Talk:Dual power

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A Proposal[edit]

The entire second section here should probably be merged into the Zapatista article since that is its main relevance. Thoughts? --Mashford 23:23, 21 October 2005 (UTC)

I agree

This needs cleaning up. I'd also like to see the ideas broken up into subheadings for easier reading and consistency. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.189.177.154 (talk) 04:56, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

Left-Liberal groups listed as examples[edit]

A bunch of NGOs with little or no relation to the topic were listed as examples. Replaced that with an actual current instance of dual power. 72.228.177.92 (talk) 07:37, 24 January 2011 (UTC)

All wrong[edit]

This is all wrong. This refers much much more to prefigurative politics than to dual power. I'd propose that this be merged in with prefigurative politics page and this should either be shut down or rewritten.

Dual power refers to a specific period during the Russian Revolution, between the overthrow of the Tsar in February 1917 and the overthrow of the Provisional Government in October 1917. During that period there was a competition for political legitimacy between the power of the working-class and peasantry, embodied in the Soviet, and the Russian capitalists embodied in the Duma (or parliament). The famous call for "All power to the Soviets!" was a claim related to the concept of dual power. It was a call for resolving the dual power contradiction by putting the power of the working-class in charge.

It doesn't make sense to say that workers coops, or TAZs are comparable. One couldn't conceivably call for "all power to the workers co-ops" or "all power to the TAZs."

A far better modern comparison would be the General Assembly of the OWS movement.

I'd suggest checking out the part on dual power in Trotsky's history of the russian revolution http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1930/hrr/ch11.htm — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.18.24.123 (talk) 20:18, 11 December 2011 (UTC)

This Article On Dual Power Solely Portrays the Anarchist Conception and Completely Purges to Original Socialist Conception of It[edit]

The concept of Dual Power was originally conceived by Lenin in 1917 during the Russian Revolution. Here are two sources from that time period.

http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/apr/09.htm http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/may/20.htm

Here is a classic treatise on it by Trotsky from his History of the Russian Revolution (1930)

http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1930/hrr/ch11.htm

Not only does this article omit all this historical information, it completely purges the origins of this concept within socialism and presents it as purely an anarchist strategy. Worse than that, I browsed through this page's history and previous versions did contain this information so this purging may have been deliberate.

Despite the origins of this concept from socialist thinkers, it has relatively recently been picked up on by some anarchists who see it as a strategy for creating liberated spaces that prefigure the future society and gradually eclipse capitalism. This is in contrast to the socialist conception of dual power where it is not a strategy but an unstable, temporary situation which emerges in revolutionary moments where workers' councils compete with the State for power, with one ultimately winning out over the other.