Talk:Dubnium

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Elements (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is supported by WikiProject Elements, which gives a central approach to the chemical elements and their isotopes on Wikipedia. Please participate by editing this article, or visit the project page for more details.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject University of California (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject University of California, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles relating to University of California, its history, accomplishments and other topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject California / San Francisco Bay Area (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject California, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of California on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the San Francisco Bay Area task force (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Russia / Technology & engineering / Science & education (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Russia, a WikiProject dedicated to coverage of Russia on Wikipedia.
To participate: Feel free to edit the article attached to this page, join up at the project page, or contribute to the project discussion.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the technology and engineering in Russia task force.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the science and education in Russia task force.
 
Version 0.5
Peer review This Natsci article has been selected for Version 0.5 and subsequent release versions of Wikipedia.


Untitled[edit]

Article changed over to new Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements format by maveric149. Elementbox converted 10:23, 15 July 2005 by Femto (previous revision was that of 14:48, 12 July 2005).

Information Sources[edit]

Some of the text in this entry was rewritten from Los Alamos National Laboratory - Dubnium.

Data for the table were obtained from the sources listed on the subject page and Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements but were reformatted and converted into SI units.


Liam Morland[edit]

I've reverted the discoverer back to an old state "Russian scientists" and not "Liam Morland".

  • There's no evidence, except for that derived from Wikipedia that it was discovered by Liam Morland
  • It had no citation
  • The edit was made by an IP which has only made four edits, each changing inappropriate things to say "Liam Morland".

I think that means that it's overwhelmingly likely to be vandalism. If not, then apologies Liam! 131.111.21.21 (talk) 19:35, 22 May 2009 (UTC)

Talk[edit]

Evidence??[edit]

Text says:

This relatively high stability compared to the surrounding elements on the periodic table gives evidence that by manipulating the number of neutrons in a nucleus, one can alter the stabilities of such nuclei.

I say: why is that an issue? I thought it was proven since early 20th century. Maybe the text intends towards the island of stability? Rursus 21:22, 30 November 2006 (UTC)

Former contradiction (now fixed since anno dazumal)[edit]

The first sentence of the history section contains a contradiction:

"Dubnium ... was reportly first synthesized in early 1970 by Albert Ghiorso in Dubna..."

Ghiorso worked in Berkeley. I suspect that this sentence is a compromise between the two competing versions of the history of the discovery:

1) the element was discovered by Ghiorso in Berkeley

2) the element was discovered by Flyorov in Dubna

--Anon

Fixed. Thanks for the note. --mav

Density[edit]

Hello,

Is the estimated density really 39 g·cm—3? This is nearly twice that of other heavy elements... Yann 23:21, 1 June 2007 (UTC)

Also, what's the source for this number? Both of the two sites linked at the bottom of the page either don't give a density, or say "no data". Unless there is a reliable source, this should be simply omitted. Kingdon 14:51, 4 June 2007 (UTC)
This edit. Unsourced, removed. Femto 16:12, 4 June 2007 (UTC)

Production of Dubnium 268[edit]

Dubnium 268 is listed on the isotope table but there is no mention of its production. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.229.45.155 (talkcontribs)

Halflife error[edit]

Couldn't find anything about this 268Db having a halflife of 29h, except this link: Fig Branch, whose text happenstance is the same as that of this article. Halflife of 29h seems to be a grave error. I'll soon correct the text... 268Db has been extrapolated to a half life of 6h acc2 nutab03, but that is an extrapolation. I'm going to try to find 268Db from research published on the net. If that fails, the halflife is guessed to be 6h, nothing else. Said: Rursus 16:31, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

Correcting myself: there are about 15 sources on Google claiming 268Db hl=29 h, all of them being copies of Wikipedia. Still searching. Said: Rursus 16:39, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
This link is pretty trustable:
Superheavies extend periodic table to 115
It's a little oldish, from 2004, it says 16 hours. The half life might have been remeasured since then. I'm going on. Said: Rursus 16:45, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
I decide that that link actually refers to research. The halflife of Db268 is 16 hours, there are a few sources (except wikipedia and imitators) claiming 32 h, but not 29 h. Said: Rursus 16:59, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
Not ready yet, I found one source for 28 h, but that's based on the sole 3 nuclei ever produced, article in 2007 (fresh). Said: Rursus 17:45, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
Here:
Data from XU_187225_1.ens
Said: Rursus 17:46, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
The oldest value is the 6h extrapolation, then came 16h (by Oganessian et al. 2004), then a tentative 32h (2005, M. GUPTA, THOMAS W. BURROWS??) and a current value of 28h (S. Geraedts and B. Singh (McMaster), 2007). Said: Rursus 18:17, 1 June 2008 (UTC)


infobox[edit]

I've removed from the infobox: |- | 261Db | syn | 1.8 s[1] | α | 8.93 | 257Lr |- | 260Db | syn | 1.5 s[1] | α | 9.13,9.08,9.05 | 256Lr |- | 259Db | syn | 0.5 s[1] | α | 9.47 | 255Lr |- | rowspan="2" | 258Db | rowspan="2" | syn | rowspan="2" | 4.4 s[1] | 67% α | 9.17,9.08,9.01 | 254Lr |- | 33% ε | | 258Rf |- | 257mDb | syn | 0.76 s[1] | α | 9.16 | 253Lr |- | 257gDb | syn | 1.50 s[1] | α | 9.07,8.97 | 253Lr |- | rowspan="2" | 256Db | rowspan="2" | syn | rowspan="2" | 1.6 s[1] | 70% α | 9.12,9.08,9.01,8.89 | 253Lr |- | 30% ε | | 256Rf

Nergaal (talk) 18:11, 25 March 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference lifetimes was invoked but never defined (see the help page).