Talk:Duris of Samos

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New version[edit]

See Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Classical Greece and Rome#Recent uploading of pages by 67.111.218.66. The existing short page (which wasn't especially good or up to date) has been replaced with what looks like a student essay. Interwiki links etc. have been deleted. I'll work on combining the best of both versions. Andrew Dalby 21:15, 16 December 2008 (UTC)

The following sentences from the essay puzzle me.
During his life he also took in Phylarchus as his own pupil. He tutored Phylarchus and molded him into a historian, very similar to Duris himself.[1] By examining some of the works of Phylarchus, it is possible to gain a glimpse of information about Duris that has been lost over time.
    • ^ Bowder, Diana, ed. Who Was Who in the Greek World. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1982. 101-02.
    I don't believe there is evidence that Duris had Phylarchus (or anyone else) as a pupil, so I think the writer, or possibly Bowder, has misunderstood something. If there is evidence, please, someone, re-insert the information with a primary or secondary source reference. Andrew Dalby 12:36, 18 December 2008 (UTC)
    I removed all of the following --
    • Duris’ arrogant criticism of these two factual based historians sparked the temper of one of the greatest Hellenistic historians, Polybius. Polybius lived from 200-118 BC and was one of the most accurate, serious, and scholarly historians the Hellenistic world ever experienced. Polybius deeply believed in history as a precise and accurate collection of facts. He did not like Duris’ emotional and dramatically exaggerated style of history. Polybius’ criticism of Duris is actually more directly targeted at his pupil, Phylarchus. Phylarchus was taught by Duris and wrote in the same style as Duris. It is believed that Duris must have simply taught Phylarchus everything he knew, in effect creating a duplicate of himself. Therefore, the censure of Phylarchus can be directly attributed to Duris and his teachings. Polybius enthusiastically denounces Phylarchus’ writing as erroneous and worthless. Phylarchus was accused of falsifying speeches and focusing too much on rhetoric and sensationalism in his writings. These two complaints were probably constantly brought forth against Duris as well. Both shared the same style of writing and therefore must have drawn the same criticism. Phylarchus was mocked and disrespected for his attempts to be an emotional and tragic historian. Although allowances for rhetoric were often made during this time period, Phylarchus was still ruthlessly jeered at. Phylarchus was probably simply too dramatic to gain the respect of his fellow historians.
    -- because none of it is relevant to Duris: I have just verified that Polybius never mentions Duris. Andrew Dalby 14:22, 18 December 2008 (UTC)