Talk:EPOXI

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New NASA mission[edit]

EPOXI is a new mission using an existing spacecraft, Deep Impact. It was announced in NASA Press Release 07-147. An extract follows...

NASA GIVES TWO SUCCESSFUL SPACECRAFT NEW ASSIGNMENTS
WASHINGTON -- Two NASA spacecraft now have new assignments after successfully completing their missions. The duo will make new observations of comets and characterize extrasolar planets. Stardust and Deep Impact will use their flight-proven hardware to perform new, previously unplanned, investigations.

I've made a brief start and will add some more details and a reference next.--Chris Jefferies 22:38, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

Hmm... Having started this new article I'm not sure whether it would be better to keep everything within Deep Impact. I'm going to hold off adding any more detail until there are comments from others. Which way should we take this? Perhaps I got overexcited when I saw the NASA press release :-( --Chris Jefferies 22:59, 3 July 2007 (UTC)


The new mission has a webpage... epoxi.umd.edu 129.2.14.148 18:23, 27 September 2007 (UTC)

While it is the same spacecraft, it has new objectives/targets. In addition the spacecraft has been renamed and the mission itself is called EPOXI. Deep Impact is done. Elizabeth 68.84.3.185 (talk) 02:55, 15 December 2007 (UTC)

Actually, at one point, they thought they were going to change the name of the spacewcraft, but then decided not to... The name of the spacecraft is still the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft. 68.84.3.185 (talk) 23:44, 18 July 2008 (UTC) Elizabeth

Keep the new article.LanceBarber (talk) 08:41, 18 February 2008 (UTC)

Stunning video of moon transiting Earth[edit]

There's an amazing quicktime video at

http://www.nasa.gov/mov/260503main_red_green_blue2.mov

from EPOXI, of the moon transiting Earth. I checked with Nancy Jones at NASA and she told me that the video is public domain but should be credited to:

Credit: Donald J. Lindler, Sigma Space Corporation/GSFC; EPOCh/DIXI Science Teams

Can someone convert this video into a Wikimedia Commons-friendly format and upload? Spikebrennan (talk) 18:53, 18 July 2008 (UTC)

The mission webpage has animated gifs available. 68.84.3.185 (talk) 23:44, 18 July 2008 (UTC) Elizabeth

EPOXI Earth and Moon[edit]

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/epoxi_transit.html —Preceding unsigned comment added by Root Beers (talkcontribs) 05:14, 22 July 2008 (UTC)

EPOCh paper[edit]

See this paper for more on EPOCh http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=4839704&tag=1 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.79.176.244 (talk) 22:27, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

EPOXI's next mission[edit]

I understand after EPOXI's succesful comet Hartley flyby the spacecraft lacks enough fuel for any major trajectory changes could NASA use its telescope cameras to search for trojan asteroids in Earths,Mars or Venus neighborhoods. Jalanp2 (talk) 18:50, 20 November 2010 (UTC)

On November 25 the spacecraft had to be decommissioned. [1]Fjörgynn (talk) 11:10, 30 November 2010 (UTC)
The referenced fact sheet says the spacecraft was planned to be decommissioned on or about Nov 25. But a statement by the project manager, Tim Larson, at a post flyby news conference indicated that the spacecraft's fate is still under consideration. "NASA's looking at future uses, but that won't be decided for a little while... We're looking forward to hearing some good ideas," [2].--agr (talk) 14:58, 30 November 2010 (UTC)

Nope, we're still flying.137.78.36.246 (talk) 23:31, 8 November 2011 (UTC)

Combine with Deep Impact[edit]

The is essentially an extension of the Deep Impact mission sans the impactor. Should the articles be combined into a joint article? It seems trivial for them to be separate and yet be the same craft and somewhat similar objectives. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Xession (talkcontribs) 08:49, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

Absolutely not. Deep Impact and EPOXI are completely separate missions with vastly different objectives. EPOXI is not an extension of Deep Impact, but a Mission of Opportunity that makes use of an existing spacecraft. I believe that different pages are a necessity.137.78.36.246 (talk) 23:31, 8 November 2011 (UTC)

New data released from EPOXI[edit]

EPOXI recently released images taken of astrophysical objects by the spacecraft. Read more here: http://epoxi.umd.edu/3gallery/deepsky.shtml

The mission has also made the images available to the public for an "image processing challenge" http://epoxi.umd.edu/3gallery/deepsky_challenge.shtml