Talk:Eastern Bloc emigration and defection

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Defection TO Eastern bloc[edit]

There were also a small number of defections INTO the Eastern Bloc. The article should have something about this ? 86.112.89.54 (talk) 23:21, 8 March 2010 (UTC)


pictures of dead people[edit]

it is entirely gut-wrenching, but is it truly appropriate to have this mans dead body on display, without any warning to the sensitive or the children?

i also wonder what his family would think of his picture being used here. Decora (talk) 03:30, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

Strange sentence[edit]

Almost no emigration occurred from the Soviet Union in the 1950s and 1960s, except for ethnic Armenians returning to Armenia - how could they return to Armenia via emigration from the USSR if Armenia was inside the USSR?--MathFacts (talk) 23:24, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

Population trends 1961–2009: USSR and former Soviet Union.[edit]

What does this picture indicate? What connection it has to emigration? Population decline in post-Soviet era was due to increased mortality and decreased births, not due to emigration. In fact currently there is a great influx of immigrants into Russia.--MathFacts (talk) 23:39, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

File:GPU.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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Creation of the Eastern Bloc[edit]

exactly because of the reason given in the article relating to the split with the soviets in 1948, and yugoslavia's key role in the non aligned movement- the country cannot be considered an eastern bloc country. it was something else. a point of interchange if you will. yugoslavia was not behind the iron curtain. they could travel, and trade with the west. that they bought eastern bloc commodities with western goods should clear things up. regardless, this needs to be removed. yugoslavija left the soviet sphere in 1948. the colloquial saying in yugoslavia is that the russians sent them a huge bag of rice and then tito sent him a little jar of preserved hot peppers. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.237.180.162 (talk) 07:19, 26 May 2012 (UTC)

That part of the article makes a laughing stock from the whole article. It implies Yugoslavia was a part of the soviet block, which is not true. Yugoslavia didn't have any role in the soviet block after Tito-Stalin breakup. Not only that: it was in a constant threat of Soviet invasion. I think this is a misquote or a missunderstanding of the original material, as none sane enough claiming to be a historian could write something as stupid as that. It sounds too revisionist and limited. See here for more correct ifnormation on Yugoslavia (up until 70s): http://www.shsu.edu/~his_ncp/YugoPM.html. I don't have access to the original, so I can't verify it. But you can if you are in U.S. and are interested in Eastern Bloc or Yugoslavia's history. I would also recommend rechecking the sources for this bit about Yugoslavia as they are most likely misquoted. --89.216.18.180 (talk) 15:03, 2 December 2014 (UTC)

Facts do not seem to be right[edit]

In Dec of 2012, this feature stated: "After World War II, emigration restrictions were imposed by countries in the Eastern Bloc, which consisted of the Soviet Union and its satellite states in Central and Eastern Europe."

In reality, the USSR kept people from departing and having the right to travel soon after its establishment in 1917.

See for example Wikipedia: Illegal emigration

"Illegal emigration refers to a person moving across national borders in a way that violates emigration laws... Russia implemented emigration restrictions two months after the Russian Revolution of 1917, with the various Soviet Socialist Republics of the Soviet Union thereafter banning emigration. After the creation of the Eastern Bloc from countries occupied by the Soviet Union during World War II, Eastern Bloc countries instituted emigration bans similar to those in the Soviet Union. After the erection of the Berlin Wall in 1961, emigration except for ethnic migration reasons mostly halted from east-to-west, though a few thousand escape attempts from East Germany occurred, including those by defecting border guards. (More generally, escape by any citizen was considered defection.) North Korea also strictly controls emigration.[1] ... The stance of the United Nations is that freedom to emigrate is a human right, part of the right to freedom of movement. According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, "Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country"."

So here you have two Wikipedia articles that are in conflict. The item on "Illegal emigration" is clearly the one that's right, the beginning of Eastern Bloc emigration and defection is wrong.

90.191.147.226 (talk) 13:54, 7 December 2012 (UTC)