Talk:Economic Espionage Act of 1996

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Untitled[edit]

The allegations about echelon and its use in economic espionage in the last paragraph are dubious. if there is collection, it's usually focused on bribery by Euroepan companies (a normal business practice in some EU countries), not on access to technologies. the best remark on teh subject came from a former Director of Central Intelligence, James Woolsy, who said “most European technology just isn’t worth our stealing.”

- And Echelon is not relevant to discussion of the EEA in any event. If there are corresponding laws in the EU, those would be relevant. 68.165.204.148 (talk) 11:47, 11 July 2008 (UTC)

First conviction[edit]

After an August, 2008 plea of guilt for (one count) of violating the Economic Espionage Act and one count of violating the Arms Export Control Act, San Jose U.S. District Court Judge Jeremy Fogel sentenced Canadian citizen Xiaodong Sheldon Meng, 44, to 24 months in federal prison, 3 years of parole and a $10,000 fine, with forfeiture of computer equipment seized. Meng was indicted in December 2006, with 36 counts, "for stealing military software from a Silicon Valley defense contractor and trying to sell it to the Chinese military." The first to be convicted, Meng admitted "illegally obtaining a program used for military training from Quantum3D and later using the program in a demonstration to the Chinese navy after he no longer worked for the firm; he attempted to sell the fighter-pilot training software programs to the Royal Thai Air Force, the Royal Malaysian Air Force and the Navy Research Center in China." He paid $ 500,000 bond, for temporary liberty, until August 18 when he begins serving sentence.sfgate.com, Salesman gets 2 years for industrial spyingAfp.google.com, Engineer is first sentenced for economic espionage--Florentino floro (talk) 09:26, 19 June 2008 (UTC)


August 2008? 68.165.204.148 (talk) 11:40, 11 July 2008 (UTC)