Talk:Edward Weston (chemist)

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Historic milestones[edit]

http://www.archive.org/stream/chronologicalhis00natirich/chronologicalhis00natirich_djvu.txt

A CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF ELECTRICAL DEVELOPMENT FROM 600 B.C.

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION; 155 EAST 44th STREET; NEW YORK 17, N. Y.; PRICE $2.00

Copyright 1946; National Electrical Manufacturers Association; Printed in U. S. A.

Excerpts from this book may be used without permission

Weston, Dr. Edward, 1872, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1885, 1887, 1888, 1890, 1893, 1896

Weston Electrical Instrument Co., 1888

1872 DR. EDWARD WESTON (1850-1936) is the first to apply the dynamo to electroplating to provide current, thus replacing the inefficient batteries in use.

1875 It is generally believed that Dr. Edward Weston is the first person in the United States to use an electric arc furnace industrially. Dr. Weston patents laminated pole pieces and cores for dynamos raising their efficiency from about forty-five to eighty-five per cent; also patents an anode and develops a nickel solution containing boric acid for making a superior, dense, malleable plated nickel.

1876 Dr. Edward Weston designs his first generator for electroplating. It is rated at three-quarters of a horsepower at eight hundred revolutions per minute, has a shunt field winding, and has the first laminated construction used in a rotating armature, thereby reducing the internal losses.

1877 Dr. Edward Weston gives the first public exhibition of arc lighting in the United States when he installs a corner street light in Newark, New Jersey. He also used the arc light for general lighting purposes.

1878 Dr. Edward Weston feeds the current generated by one dynamo to a second dynamo, using the second dynamo as an electric motor for industrial purposes. Weston uses soft metal cores for arc light carbons. He copperplates the ends of arc light carbons for better contact.

1885 Dr. Edward Weston develops the hydrocarbon flashing process for making uniform carbon lamp filaments (Patent No. 310,761, January 13); receives Patent No. 327,908, October 6, for a magnetic drag-type speedometer the first example of our present-day automobile speedometer.

1885 Dr. Edward Weston discovers a chemical process by which nitrocellulose is made into pure fiberless cellulose. This leads to the first successful homogeneous carbon lamp filament which is made by Dr. Weston and is known as the "tamadine" filament.

1887 Dr. Edward Weston compounds a workable German silver alloy containing thirty per cent nickel. He discovers an alloy, later known as "Constantan," in which it is shown for the first time that a metal can have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, that is, its resistance becomes less with increasing temperature. The invention of "Manganin," the alloy now used universally for resistors of high accuracy, followed shortly thereafter. The resistance of "Manganin" is virtually constant within reasonable temperature limits.

1888 The Weston Electrical Instrument Co. is formed by Edward Weston. Dr. Weston formulates the design principle for a permanent magnetic system. The first permanent magnet, movable coil, direct reading electrical measuring instrument was developed and placed on the American market by Dr. Weston.

1890 Dr. Edward Weston produces a direct reading deflection type electrodynamometer.

1893 The external shunt type of ammeter is invented by Dr. Edward Weston. The shunt in connection with a millivoltmeter was first used especially for measuring high currents. A patent was issued on Weston standard cell and later was dedicated to the public. The standard cell is used as a reference basis for the "volt" and is found in every standardizing laboratory in the world.

1896 The General Electric Company and the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company license each other to manufacture under its patents. General Electric holds the patents of Thomson, Brush, Edison, Sprague, Van Depoele, Bradley, and others; Westinghouse holds those of Sawyer-Man, Maxim, Weston, Tesla, Stanley, and others.

1910 The International Technical Committee meets at the Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C. in the spring. Representatives of France, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States attend. At this meeting the "Weston" normal cell is recommended as a standard for the volt (1.0183 volts at 20C.) and is accepted by the various national laboratories in January, 1911.

-71.174.175.104 (talk) 22:36, 3 July 2009 (UTC)