Talk:Edwardian era

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Untitled[edit]

It seems to me there should be more historical facts...I would also think this is a stub.Zigzig20s 03:05, 14 December 2006 (UTC)

Also, we should be able to find this page if we search for "edwardian age"...I don't know how to do the redirecting thing so I'll let someone else do it for me... I was just joking, ofcourse,,Zigzig20s 03:11, 14 December 2006 (UTC)



This article is a wierd hodge-podge of complete generalities and randomly selected and inconsequential facts. It starts off by giving four different definitions for the period and gets worse. The preceding/current/following block at the end of the article uses 1901-1910 - but then more than half of the "significant events" fall outside these limits!

The topics chosen for discussion are also puzzling. For example, why is one of the three paragraphs in "Class and Society" devoted to corsets? (Half the comments about "corsets" refer to events outside the period anyway.) Presumably somebody chose the detailed topics "Class and Society" and "the Arts" as being particularly significant to the period, but then why is only one of the "significant events" at all related to these topics?

One major omission is the lack of any acknowlegement that the Edwardian period was one of political turmoil, arguably the most tumultuous in the 20th century in the UK. It saw a major constitutional crisis with a stand-off between the Commons and the Lords, the threat of a mutiny by many officers of the Army over the Irish question, the first stirrings of the Indian idependence movement, severe industrial disruption and the military occupation of many working-class areas of Britain (esp. South Wales), the rise of the Labour party, and a mass movement for universal suffrage (of which female suffrage was a part). This was in addition to the "arms race" with Germany that led to WWI.

--58.108.246.17 10:53, 1 November 2007 (UTC)

First section[edit]

I would concur this is a very disjointed article. The first thing to read about for the Edwardian Age is women and contraceptives? Clearly it has relevancy and a place, but even the idea of "contraception" as a concept is much newer than the history this is supposed to be addressing. That's all secondary to the notion that this article seems hodge-podged, and definitely from a very limited vantage point. Perhaps the contents would be better suited towards subtopics. Granted, the lack of referenced material might lead me to believe none of this is scholarly, or copywritten material shoe-horned into an article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 132.183.13.16 (talk) 17:39, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

Edwardian Oxymoron[edit]

"the British class system was very rigid. Economic and social changes created an environment in which there was more social mobility." I don't know enough about the history to lean one way or another but I know they seem to me to be mutually exclusive. Musicandnintendo (talk) 01:15, 21 June 2014 (UTC)

It's somewhat true that changing economics ran headlong into ossified social stratification. Regardless, that section was unsourced and smells a lot like original research. I'd leave it out until it can be responsibly restored. Chris Troutman (talk) 06:23, 21 June 2014 (UTC)