Talk:Effective Cycling

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integrate: "shared space" and empirical evidence[edit]

I saw some data in german which showed on average significantly more cyclist deaths and accidents after bicyles lanes where installed. My experience is the same. That is that most bicycle lanes are not designed intelligently and actually decuple the risk of death or severe accident for the cyclist. Bumpy side walks just painted red with bicycle lanes is one example for a dangerous and inconvenient design. Cyclists get run over by vehicles from side streets expecting a fast moving vehicle on the main street but not on the side walk, even though the ground crossing the side street is painted red. I saw this happen myself once to an unobservant cyclist who was run over by an equally unobservant motorist. Probably the cyclist thought himself safe because he paralled a big street and made no turn. And the motorist thought she had the right of way because the red paint crossed her side street from a pedestrian side walk not on grade. So the side streed for her ended not before the red paint but some meters afterward, joining the main street. --demus wiesbaden (talk) 21:38, 25 November 2008 (UTC)

'not on grade' may be a confusing term, especially for non-native english speakers, or even non-highway-engineers ! A 'grade crossing' is also known as a 'level crossing' - not an underpass or overbridge. In this case the side walk probably had a kerb (UK) or curb (US). It is probably open to question whether this would count as 'on grade'. To further confuse things, the word comes for the Latin for 'step' - gradus'. --195.137.93.171 (talk) 13:28, 6 October 2010 (UTC)

Mis-Quoting Conor Reynolds, University of British Columbia[edit]

The article states

the authors of a meta-study on cycle infrastructure safety research at the University of British Columbia[2], who have publicly stated that "In comparison to cycling on bicycle-specific infrastructure (paths, lanes, routes), on-road cycling appears to be less safe."[3]

[2] http://www.ehjournal.net/content/8/1/47

Results to date suggest that sidewalks and multi-use trails pose the highest risk, major roads are more hazardous than minor roads, and the presence of bicycle facilities (e.g. on-road bike routes, on-road marked bike lanes, and off-road bike paths) was associated with the lowest risk.

[3] http://www.ehjournal.net/content/8/1/47/comments

In comparison to cycling on sidewalks and on multiuse paths, on-road cycling appears to be safer. In comparison to cycling on bicycle-specific infrastructure (paths, lanes, routes), on-road cycling appears to be less safe.

So the UBC study defines 3 categories of facilities:

  • Safest
bicycle-specific infrastructure (paths, lanes, routes)
  • Intermediate
on-road cycling
  • Least Safe
sidewalks and on multiuse paths or trails

Selective quotation is misleading. I've tried to add

However, that study also concludes that "sidewalks and multi-use trails pose the highest risk" and Forester has published a reply.

[1]

  1. ^ Forester, John (2009-10-31). "A Review of Comments on "The impact of transportation infrastructure on bicycling injuries and crashes: a review of the literature"". Retrieved 2010-10-06. 

But for some reason I can't submit to articles, only talk pages ! Please do it for me ! --195.137.93.171 (talk) 14:00, 6 October 2010 (UTC)

Upgraded my router and managed it myself! --195.137.93.171 (talk) 14:30, 7 March 2012 (UTC)