Talk:Einstein ring

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WikiProject Astronomy (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
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starting from which mass size ?[edit]

Is the math universal or does bending only aply to large masses. For example if one took the right distance, and optics, could one use the moon for it ?. (i do think because the moon has been used to proove that light can be bended during an eclips. But i wonder if it could be made usefully in optics based on a distance satelite to have a combined largest lens. ..Also how about small masses ? the given formula doesnt seam to contain limits. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.217.115.160 (talk) 12:12, 11 June 2010 (UTC)


14MB gif[edit]

The animation is cool and useful, but it's frickin' enormous! I'll have a go at optimising it into something more practical. ▫ UrbaneLegend talk 18:46, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

Done. It's down to a much more manageable 579KB. I've speeded it up too. ▫ UrbaneLegend talk 08:53, 22 May 2006 (UTC)

Hubble Finds Double Einstein Ring[edit]

I don't know anything on this subject, but if someone with more knowledge than me wants to, there's an article about the Hubble taking snapshots of a double Einstein Ring:

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2008/04/

~~ Dan —Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.223.78.8 (talk) 23:47, 13 January 2008 (UTC)

confusing bending space time or light only[edit]

The articles decribe that light is bended, actualy i think this i a wrong dicritption, its not light that is bended but the framwwork of space and time itself. Even if something was leaving the distant solar world and came to us, that would be bended too., not only light travels the space time but matter also can. In other words, einstein rings are not like a prisma that bends light in a fixed space time. an einstein ring bends the space itself whatever passes through. Can someone with a highee degree confirm that an einstein ring is not like a prisma bending light. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.153.198.224 (talk) 21:57, 21 June 2009 (UTC)

The equation is incorrect[edit]

for distances D_SL = 0, can not be zero deflection, because it would mean that the light goes in a straight line near the lens, which is contrary to the assumption: the lens is considered. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.7.233.185 (talk) 19:26, 7 May 2012 (UTC)