Talk:El Buscón

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Also published in English as Pablo de Segovia[edit]

In addition to Paul the Sharper or The Scavenger and The Swindler, mentioned at the beginning of the article, El Buscón also appeared in English as Pablo de Segovia. The 1892 edition published by T. Fisher Unwin in London under this title is famous for its illustrations by Daniel Vierge. It has an essay on the life and writings of Quevedo by Henry Edward Watts and comments on Vierge's drawings by Joseph Pennell. It contains 20 illustrations by Vierge not included in the French edition mentioned in the section Editions of the work. The title of that edition, not mentioned there, is Histoire de Pablo de Ségovie; the publisher was Bonhoure, Paris. Vierge was unable to finish the illustrations for the Bonhoure edition because he suffered a stroke. His right side was paralyzed, and he could no longer use his right hand. The new illustrations for the Unwin edition were done with his left. As Pennell writes in his "Comments on the Drawings of Daniel Urrabieta Vierge" in Pablo de Segovia, Vierge "simply trained himself to work with his left hand, and to-day, as is proved by the last twenty illustrations in this book ... he is producing drawings which are unsurpassed" (p.iv). --64.134.31.188 (talk) 22:16, 7 January 2014 (UTC)