Talk:Elizabeth Blackwell

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Comment[edit]

I've removed these two hekklauish life is so cool ya man.revisions, which consisted only of the addition of vandalism, on the request of the person mentioned in that vandalism:

  1. (cur) (last) 00:19, Jun 8, 2005 68.105.118.192 (→References and external links) (timestamp 20050607221806)
  2. (cur) (last) 00:18, Jun 8, 2005 68.105.118.192 (→References and external links) (timestamp 20050607221955)

Angela. 12:57, Jun 11, 2005 (UTC)

Elizabeth Blackwell 19-cent Stamp[edit]

The Syracuse University Medical Alumnae Association commissioned my father (Joseph S. Kozlowski; 1912-1991) to paint a portrait of Elizabeth Blackewell in the mid-1960s. The portrait hung for some time in the lobby of the Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. Subsequent to presentation of the portrait to the Med Center the USPS released the 18-cent Blackwell stamp. When we saw the stamp we were appalled. The broach at Blackwell’s neck was precisely the same as the broach in the painting by my father. The broach appeared nowhere in my father's research for the painting; it was an invention specifically for the portrait.

Starting in mid-March 1974 there was an exchange of correspondence between myself and James Hanley - then a Congressman from the State of New York and Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. Mr. Hanley contacted the Post Master General at the time, Mr. Ted Klassen. Following some investigation on Mr. Klassen's part I received a letter which reads in part: "The artwork used for this stamp consisted of a photograph. However, we now have determined that this photograph depicts the Elizabeth Blackwell portrait painted by Joseph Kazlowski (sic). ..."

It's my understanding that the rules for attribution for artwork destined for postage stamps were changed and strengthened at the USPS as a result of the incident. I suspect the plagiarism was, in this case, inadvertant.

Just a interesting footnote to history. I’m not sure that it has a place in an article about Elizabeth Blackwell.

Joekoz451 23:18, 15 November 2005 (UTC)]]


Help On Elizabeth Blackwell[edit]

WikiWiz I have been doing a report on Elizabeth Blackwell. I just need to find out something. Think you can help? Thank you. I need to know what she did after she graduated from medical college. Thank you! Post down here:


Q: What did Elizabeth Blackwell do after graduating from medical college?

A:

Not the same Elizabeth Blackwell as the 18th-centruy herbal at http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/ttp/ttpbooks.html


What was Elizabeth Blackwell's religious affiliations and/or background?

Birthplace[edit]

The History Channel list her birthplace as Hastings, not Bristol as stated in the article. Can anybody produce a robust source of this information? Without one, I'm inclined to change the article to show Hastings as her birthplace. Waggers 12:54, 14 March 2007 (UTC)

Check the National Institutes of Health biography: it says that she was from Bristol. Nyttend 03:35, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

Error[edit]

Typo at the bottom of the biog- publication date 1895 not 1795

Requested move[edit]

Elizabeth Blackwell (doctor)Elizabeth Blackwell — The doctor is far more well known. This is evidenced by the links to the dab page. After fixing most of the links, I realized that pretty much all of them are linking to the doctor. —Brewcrewer 05:29, 31 October 2007 (UTC)

Survey[edit]

Feel free to state your position on the renaming proposal by beginning a new line in this section with *'''Support''' or *'''Oppose''', then sign your comment with ~~~~. Since polling is not a substitute for discussion, please explain your reasons, taking into account Wikipedia's naming conventions.
  • Support - the major figure of this name. --mervyn 07:32, 31 October 2007 (UTC)

Discussion[edit]

Any additional comments:

"s" or "z"[edit]

On 26 November 2007 IP editor 72.160.116.149 changed all the occurrences of "Elizabeth" to "Elisabeth". All the sources I read use Elizabeth, so I am changing them back to "z" version. --Bejnar (talk) 00:09, 20 December 2007 (UTC)

number of siblings[edit]

I think there's an error concerning the number of E B's siblings. In the first section it is stated that she was the 3rd of 9 children (i.e. she had 8 siblings) and that she lost 6 sisters and 2 borthers (i.e. all 8) early. Yet later two adult brothers are referred to. Icuka (talk) 14:00, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

I agree something doesn't add up. This error leapt out at me at a very cursory reading of the article. Dawaegel (talk) 12:46, 24 March 2011 (UTC)

US Sanitary Commission[edit]

This article should mention Blackwell's role in establishing the United States Sanitary Commission. Kaldari (talk) 20:12, 28 April 2011 (UTC)

Use of word "abortionist"[edit]

DonnaHalper (talk) 22:09, 7 March 2012 (UTC) Under the section "Decision to enter medical school," it says that ... "Abortionists were known as “female physicians”, a name Elizabeth found degrading to what a female physician could potentially achieve." Today, the term "abortionist" is very contested, and is generally associated with the pro-life position, as it seeks to castigate a medical person by referring to only one procedure that the medical person performs. While I am not the word police, before I change it, I wanted to ask whether such usage is historically accurate, and if not, doesn't it violate Wikipedia's NPOV?

I would argue that the usage of the term "abortionist" is not the same as the way in which it is used in the abortion debate today. Blackwell uses the term "abortionist" in her autobiography, referring to the women who actually specialized in performing abortions in the 1800s - and were termed "female physicians" as a euphemism. These women, like Madame Restell, were not medical doctors. In fact, part of the reason Blackwell decided to gain an MD degree was that she wanted to reclaim the term "female physician" from its negative association with abortionists at the time. Redanemone (talk) 22:57, 7 March 2012 (UTC)

citizenship?[edit]

nothing said on this in the article. wonder if she shouldn't also be described as an English medical doctor, etc. Mayumashu (talk) 02:01, 26 December 2012 (UTC)

Semiprotect this article?[edit]

Would some nice admin like to sprotect this article for awhile or forever? The IP vandalism is constant and clearly isn't ever going to stop. It's not so much a matter of frequency as proportion. SBHarris 01:45, 2 May 2013 (UTC)

material from women in medicine[edit]

This content was inserted in the women in medicine article recently. It's a bit over-specific for that article, so I thought I'd bring it over here. Anybody want to take on editing it:

Although the first medical school was established in 1767, Elizabeth Blackwell, the first women to be admitted did not attend until 1847. She was told that she might attend if she was disguised in male clothing, a ploy that had been successful for and English women, Dr. Amanda Barry, who spent a life disguised as a man and whose true sex was only revealed after her death in 1865. Blackwell refused such subterfuge, determined to continue "in the light of day and with public sanction" to pursue her career. "The idea of winning a Doctor's degree gradually assumed the aspect of a great moral struggle," wrote Blackwell, who was surprised to find she had an "immense attraction" for just such a fight in spite of an almost constant lack of respect upon hear that Blackwell planned to apply to the Geneva Medical College. The medical students there thought it was a great joke and that spirit held a mock vote in which they agreed unanimously to admit her; they were shocked when she was actually accepted in the school.