Talk:Emil Bach House

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Community area[edit]

Question, do people in Chicago actually call their neighborhoods community areas (because it sounds like official jargon nonsense)? If not, there isn't any reason not to use the more common term "neighborhood." (EDIT: That was what was there originally)(END EDIT IvoShandor 01:02, 7 June 2007 (UTC))IvoShandor 00:39, 7 June 2007 (UTC)

I've lived in Chicago and Evanston for 30 years and I have heard "the Rogers Park community", "the Rogers Park area", "the Rogers Park neighborhood", or most often simply "Rogers Park" (even though Rogers Park is also the name of a park). I have never heard a single person refer to it as "the Rogers Park community area" which sounds like a technical term used by the census bureau. I would leave it "neighborhood" since this is not a technical article on the census area. -- DS1953 talk 01:11, 7 June 2007 (UTC)

Unreferenced addition[edit]

This info is good if it can be sourced, I have moved it here until the references are provided:

Blinder corresponded with Anna Bach in the early 1960's while he attempted to restore the house. She was not able to provide much information to him and it is not clear what kind of assistance Blinder had for this restoration effort. Deteriorating wood trim was replaced, retaining walls were rebuilt and the stucco was replaced over the entire exterior. It was during this perior that the six art glass windows from the second floor bedrooms were sold. Only three are known to exist - one is held by the Art Institute of Chicago, two more are in private hands. During the years Blinder owned the property, the house immediately to the south was demolished and Blinder acquired the lot, which was linked to the property in every subsequent sale.

Frank L. Miller purchased the house from the Blinders in 1970. Miller recalled that the Blinders wanted to be sure that the house would be treated with tender loving care by its next owner. Miller worked extensively to ensure that the house would be put on the newly created Chicago Landmarks list in 1977 but ended up selling the house the next year to Fedor & Sirirat Banuchi. It was during this time that the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places (January 23, 1979) and the Banuchis entered into a preservation easement agreement with the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois. After owning the house for 21 years (the longest ownership in the history of the house, including the orginal owners), the Banuchis sold the property to Reza Toulabi, a successful Chicago restauranteur and real estate developer in 1999.

IvoShandor 17:30, 28 October 2007 (UTC)