Talk:Emmer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject Agriculture (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Agriculture, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of agriculture on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Plants (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Plants, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of plants and botany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Major re-write[edit]

I have had a go at rewriting this article in accurate and neutral style. The dates and the geography of the earlier article had major errors so it semed best to start from scratch. there's more to add on evidence from genetics for the area of domestication, and on morphology. Mark Nesbitt 11:34, 4 January 2006 (UTC)

Merge from emmer wheat[edit]

The duplicate shorter article emmer wheat has been merged into this one. I've tried to organize the merge coherently, but it's far from perfect. Edit -- looking at the history, I realize that an anonymous user wanted it redirected the other way, but since then this article has changed into a far longer one.

31st October 2005 Found a useful resource site at: http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1996/V3-156.html#EMMER which, hopefully, will help with the technicalities...

Cleanup progress[edit]

The new reference confirms some of the genetics; I notice there's a deal of overlap with the main wheat article. The Emmer in Agriculture section here looks iffy Tearlach 04:06, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

Disputed material[edit]

To me, this looks like an attempt to sell emmer despite its major shortcoming: low gluten, so it produces a bread that can't support the fluffy structure of modern bread: tastes nice, but comes out like a doorstop. I've struck out dubious statements in the first paragraph. The second paragraph: Cite sources. I've searched Science News, and can find no reference to caramelized emmer grains being anti- anything.

Emmer in agriculture
Emmer is tolerant of vast differences in climate, and will produce a yield in conditions where other grains won't even germinate. Emmer is referred to in many historical records (including documentation of the Salem Witch Trials) as the primary cereal grain in the United States; Forage and grain varieties are currently being grown there for the first time in more than a century. It can absorb a complete profile of nutrients and micro nutrients in a soil and has enough room in its structure to store them. When a grain in this family can't absorb nutrients it forms gluten; Emmer has almost no gluten. Einkorn and emmer are gelatinous grains. Gelatins are the most nutritious and nutritionally accessible proteins in the world.
Emmer is the grain that created the first yeasted bread. The milled grains were mixed with the spent grain used in the brewing process, which added natural yeast. Placed on a hot stone and covered with hot ashes, the exterior grains of the loaf caramelized, forming a barrier which prevented heat penetration, allowing the inside to stay enzymatically active. The gelatinous structure of emmer stabilized the bread, allowing it to continue to breathe and ferment, creating a hard, indestructible loaf that could survive almost any environment and never mold. The caramelized grains have natural antibiotic, antibacterial, antifungal and, according to recent research (Science News, 2002), anticarcinogenic properties.

Any further thoughts? Tearlach 11:52, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

Personally it looks like someone copied much of that stuff from a "natural food" cereal box. It would be nice if more stuff could be added now as the article looks greatly reduced... of course accurate, neutral material please. --BerserkerBen 15:50, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

You have to admit it as PR in making "a hard, indestructible loaf that could survive almost any environment" as a plus point. There are quite a few academic accounts that have a historical intro. I'll have a skim of Google. Tearlach 16:20, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . Maximum and carefull attention was done to avoid any wrongly tagging any categories , but mistakes may happen... If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 17:55, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Taxonomic disagreement[edit]

In case anyone else is inspired to try to insert a citation for the taxonomy, as of August 2012 there is no agreement among the major databases: USDA GRIN, IPNI/Tropicos/The Plant List, and USDA PLANTS have mutually incompatible data, so it would be a waste of time. Sminthopsis84 (talk) 12:33, 1 September 2012 (UTC)