Talk:Endocytosis

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Endocytosis vs phagocytosis[edit]

As far as I know, endocytosis and phagocytosis are two separated ways of intake of matter, not the one being the form of another. Phagocytosis is active, mediated by pseudopodia, while endocytosis is not. --Eleassar777 23:35, 5 Feb 2005 (UTC) No phagocytosis is a form of endocytosis and other forms of endocytosis are activeHarvey McMahon 09:22, 11 May 2007 (UTC)

UK standards?[edit]

Hm...I'm confused again. Acording to a As-level textbook, "Biology 1" endorsed by OCR, phagocytosis is only restricted to phagocyte engulfing a pathogen. Other cells "eating" other materials are referred as endocytosis. Why is that? Cherubfish 17:12, 14 May 2006 (UTC)

Endo/Excocytosis[edit]

Also i'm not sure (being a relatively new student) but isn't it also true that exo and endocytosis happen by fairly unconnected mechanisms? So it isn't really true to call them opposites. -Unknown

The molecular mechanisms that control endo and exocytosis can indeed be different. However here what is meant is that the function of endocytosis is the opposite of that of exocytosis. -Unknown — Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.36.64.135 (talk) 13:37, 6 December 2012 (UTC)

Phagocytosis[edit]

Phagocytosis is not only restricted to pathogens like bacteria and viruses. The uptake of Dying (apoptotic) cells by macrophages is also called phagocytosis. See for example the review on Entrez PubMed the biomedical joural database PMID: 16369558

Fourth method of endocytosis: receptor-mediated endocytosis?[edit]

I'm not sure where this fits in on the article, perhaps a fourth method? Either way, it should be mentioned. Perhaps a merge, I'm not sure, best to discuss with whoever created it. Thoughts? Tyciol 09:09, 12 October 2006 (UTC)

Dewikification reverted[edit]

This article was deprived of its wiki formating on November 30, apparently by replacing the wiki markup with the rendered article text. No new material seems to have been added, and therefore I have reverted this. /The Phoenix 12:50, 3 December 2006 (UTC)

images would be great for this article[edit]

just a note at this point --John Cumbers 18:24, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

I'm confident that a penis and vagina have nothing to do with endocytosis and that stupid line should be removed from the article.

Illustration is confusing for this article[edit]

I think the illustration is confusing, because it is a general article about endocytosis. The illustration however depicts the transport from the plasma membrane into the nucleus, which seems to be observed, but I guess we all agree is extremely specialized (I learned there is a reference for this mechanism). Probably another picture is more informative and I think the picture should be replaced. 99.101.8.167 (talk) 06:27, 22 September 2011 Sylvia Neumann (TSRI)

I have removed the illustration as it contained several major, unforgivable errors: - I have not been able to find a single review or book in the literature listing that vesicles can move through the nuclear enveloppe into the nucleoplasm. In all my years of studying and working in a lab I have also never seen a single EM picture of a nucleus showing vesicles inside the nucleus, as shown in the illustration here. - The legend of the illustration mentionned phagosomes (a special type of endosomes) instead of more generally endosomes. In this case it is particularly obvious that the illustration is wrong, as phagosomes fuse in the cytoplasm with lysosomes, forming phagolysosomes where the contents of the phagosomes are destroyed. Delivery of the contents of phagosomes directly into the nucleus is exactly what the cells "want" to avoid because of them usually being ... you know ... nasty things like viruses which you WANT TO KEEP AS FAR AWAY FROM THE NUCLEUS AS POSSIBLE! 134.36.64.135 (talk) 13:31, 6 December 2012 (UTC) a.nicolas@dundee.ac.uk