Talk:Enteric nervous system

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The poo-poo brain comment is largely useless...Sovbeos (talk) 15:52, 9 February 2008 (UTC)

I disagree. It should probably be sourced, though. --Muna (talk) 10:19, 13 February 2008 (UTC)
Poo-poo brain? Jamestttgrays (talk) 22:34, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

The picture at the top of the article is pretty much useless -- what is it trying to say? I took an intro neuroscience class in college, and I have no idea what the pic is trying to convey. 70.168.11.227 (talk) 22:26, 23 February 2010 (UTC)

The picture should be captioned more appropriately I think, but it is relevant; It shows the layers of musculature, innervation, and mucosa from exterior to interior. 136.152.139.99 (talk) 23:27, 25 January 2012 (UTC)

Importantly, the article mentions first (with reference) that there are only 1 tenth as many ENS cells as spinal nervous system cells, then says there are more ENS "nerve cells" (imprecise term...) than cells in the spinal system. "nerve cells" should be clarified, and to my understanding these figures are contradictory. 136.152.139.99 (talk) 23:27, 25 January 2012 (UTC)

Part of Autonomic or not?[edit]

The Autonomic_nervous_system article says that "The enteric nervous system is sometimes considered part of the autonomic nervous system, and sometimes considered an independent system." This article says (at present) that it is part of it -- full stop. Sounds to me like one or the other should be corrected. But me, I don't know 'bout these things. --Keithonearth (talk) 04:03, 22 June 2011 (UTC)

The several related articles ( autonomic, ortho-, para- and enteric) disagree on how many divisions there are in the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic talk page asserts that enteric is its own system, not a part of the autonomic system. Somebody who knows more than I needs to resolve the inconsistencies in all of these articles. Jeffryfisher (talk) 19:51, 23 May 2013 (UTC)

Missing subject[edit]

I left a tag in a sentence under the function section. The topic has disappeared, and it's missing from all the versions I checked.

173.25.54.191 (talk) 20:24, 29 January 2013 (UTC)

What is autonomic?[edit]

If voluntary decisions (as shown in the Benjamin Libet experiment among others) is an illusion anyway, then there can be no division into "voluntary" and "autonomical", so the whole term "autonomical nervous system" is misframed. Then it is the making up of afterconstructs that limits what is "voluntary". This explains why extreme recoveries after brain damage and other cases of extreme neuroplasticity are linked to tolerant environments (as shown by Kurt Fischer and Christina Hinton in "Mind, Brain and Education" and by Norman Doidge in "The brain that changes itself") which does not create pressure to justify one's actions, as well as why techniques for will-based change of "autonomical" functions invariably come from cultures that do not believe in pure good and pure evil and never from, say, abrahamitic cultures (their belief in pure good and pure evil creates strong pressure to justify one's actions). See the articles "Moderating the free will debate" and "Brain" on topic page "Psychology" and the topic page "Advice of ways to stop justifying" at Pure science Wiki, http://purescience.wikia.com 37.250.198.95 (talk) 13:47, 2 April 2013 (UTC)