Talk:Enterprise resource planning

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Merging is OK[edit]

I vote for a merge of the topics Generic ERPs v. s. specific ERPs in this article.

SAE1962 (talk) 08:37, 28 January 2008 (UTC)

I presume you're speaking of Generic ERP vs. specific ERP? I have to agree with the prodder in that case; there seems to be no references and it is written like a first person essay. What did you want to merge? Kuru talk 13:10, 28 January 2008 (UTC)

About Enterprise Systems[edit]

According to the definition from the page 39 of book Managing Information Systems: An Organisational Perspective (Second Edition) (ISBN 0-273-68635-6 / ISBN 978-0-273-68635-4), the Enterprise systems is "also known as enterprise resource planing (ERP) systems", while you can find it in many journals about ERP, so that I have changed the redirection of term Enterprise system to this page where is talking about the ERP already. --Gzyeah (talk) 03:45, 4 July 2008 (UTC)

Missing the point[edit]

Unfortunately, the page reads like an advertisement - all the hygiene words such as integrated, single database, real time - none of which are fundamental to ERP. Without defining the essence of ERP the whole article misleads readers.

ERP provides unified planning of all resources that an organisation has or may need in order to produce goods and services. Unlike MRP and MRP II, the concept of ERP includes materials, sub-assemblies, workstations, tools, consumables, people in each role. The "orders" extend beyond hard orders to include generic orders that may need to be tailored, forecasts, planned (expected) orders far into the future. The processes required to make the goods and services are also resources and may also need to be planned. These can include work instructions, working diagrams etc.

Unless these scenarios are provided all that comes across is a big, integrated database. If, however, such a description is given, all the other parts become clear. For example, as part of planning, cashflow is involved, including orders taken, orders given, work in progress, lead times (internal or of suppliers).

Whether the system then consists of one or two, or multiple distributed databases is immaterial. Also an organisation may not require certain aspects planned. For example, an ERP system may cater for a 10 year plan, whereby future technologies are defined, the people who have those skills may be defined, the people who need training in these technologies may be defined, which may extend to providing bursaries to people at school today, to study at university in, say six years time. This may well be of interest to a motor manufacturer that contemplates electric car manufacture based on technologies not yet production ready. It may foresee production of generic vehicles, where the mix of automatic, manual, convertable, sedan, 4 × 4 etc. would be firmed later, but where planning with external vendors e.g. windshield manufacturers is required for them to set up their plans. Even finances may NOT be an essential aspect. For example, an ERP system could be used to plan amateur theatrics.

The concept of an expansion of bills of materials IS fundamental - the BOM can have ALL resources incorporated. For example set-up time, skills, instructions, tools, consumables. And the acquisition time for these items. And their optimal ordering quantities, standard part IDs, preferred suppliers. Transportation and distribution can be included. Similar aspects can be defined for serivces. Manufacturing is a typical area, but financail services could equally use ERP according to this concept. — Preceding unsigned comment added by AndreasMD (talkcontribs) 17:49, 18 June 2012 (UTC)

Disambiguation ERP?[edit]

This is not the ERP I have in mind. ERP stands for Event Related Potential. It's an EEG. Useful for medical imaging. Sneazy (talk) 05:26, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

Disambiguation is at ERP, your topic is at Event-related potential. Kuru (talk) 09:50, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

Intended word repetition?[edit]

The first sentence reads: "Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems integrate internal and external management management information across an entire organization—embracing finance/accounting, manufacturing, sales and service, customer relationship management, etc."

I don't believe the word "management" should be repeated. It would also be nice to get rid of the "etc." if possible. e.g.: "Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems integrate internal and external management information across an entire organization. ERP Systems include information from finance/accounting, manufacturing, sales and service, and customer relationship management, amongst others."

Aquineas (talk) 18:27, 5 March 2013 (UTC)