Talk:Equus lambei

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Really?[edit]

Equus asinus, the African wild ass from which the domestic donkey comes, lives in desert and semi-desert environments in North Africa. That's a long way from the Yukon. I don't see how the same species could be found in both places. Is this article a joke? Steve Dufour 15:26, 3 December 2006 (UTC)

Extinct animal living in Beringia, which was also a semi-desert [[steppe] environment, albeit colder. Many species have equally wide ranges. Luigizanasi 17:55, 3 December 2006 (UTC)
Thanks. You learn something every day. I still wonder about the species name, E. asinus is African and the source says the Y.W.A. is related to the Asian asses. Steve Dufour 23:39, 3 December 2006 (UTC)

Move and tag[edit]

I have moved this to the Scientific name as there is liitle use of the term "Yukon Wild Ass". While some Ice age mammals have common names this doen't seem to be one of them. I have tagged YWA with a fact template and have also tagged the statement that this is the same species as E. caballus. This should be referenced with peer reviewed journal articles not a link to government transcript. --Kevmin (talk) 00:33, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

I found a few reliable sources that give some common names; as usual, there are several common names. This is an obscure species and all the common names found so far reflect POV about affinities, so I approve of Kevmin's moving the page to Equus lambei. --Una Smith (talk) 21:43, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Thanks for the support and the improvements to the references. Accept where there is a large amount of history (eg Woolly Mammoth, Cave Bear)I personally think that extinct organisms which died before modern history should be referred to by the scientific name and not given rather arbitrary "common names" to make them "user friendly". A little science never hurt anyone ;)--Kevmin (talk) 22:05, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

Merge because outdated[edit]

Ok, this article refers to a species that is now considered equivalent to the wild horse. What are we going to do with this article? Keep as a historical reference? -- Kim van der Linde at venus 22:14, 25 September 2009 (UTC)

What are the references on this? I'm still seeing a number of uses of Equus lambei in the liturature. If, key word if, it is an accepted synymization then this page should be made a redirect to the E. ferus page and the contents merged into the E. ferus article.

Relation to modern horse Equus ferus caballus[edit]

There seems to be some slow motions editing going back and forth about the relationship between this fossil horse and the modern domestic horse. The current page states that this is ancestor to the modern horse. This edit substantially changed the substance of the article and was done without justification. I'm not qualified to be the arbiter of this, but to someone with some guidance on this article might want to take a look at establishing consensus. the Mustang talk archive has a pretty extensive discussion of this topic. For now, I'll revert the change back to the wording that the cited article support, that lambei was a close relative of ferus caballus. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.22.4.226 (talk) 00:51, 18 April 2014 (UTC)