Talk:Estado Novo (Portugal)

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Old move request[edit]

  • Oppose. Estado Novo is used as a phrase in English to refer regimes in Portugal and Brazil. (Do an "advanced search" in Google for Estado Novo - English pages only.)

Carnation Revolution[edit]

As a novice to Portuguese history I found the Carnation Revolution article contains a lot of information about Estado Novo polices (eg on overseas territories) that I thought would help improve this article. Tiddy 05:14, 10 June 2007 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The above comments refer to a previous move request FROM "Estado Novo (Portugal)" TO "New State (Portugal)." Without regard to the one oppose comment (above), the article was moved to The New State (Portugal). Comment below on whether to support or oppose a move back to Estado Novo (Portugal).

Add *Support or *Oppose followed by an optional one sentence explanation, then sign your vote with ~~~~
  • Support. (Comments above). LuiKhuntek 06:54, 4 December 2005 (UTC)
  • Support! This article just never have been moved. The Estado Novo is known as Estado Novo. New State should just be a redirect page. User The russian leader acted without consulting other editor. Move back to Estado Novo (Portugal)! The Ogre 13:42, 4 December 2005 (UTC)
  • Support I'm not a portugese history buff nor do I speak the language, however all references I have heard of so far are "Estado Novo". It's kinda like having "Third Reich" not being translatable as "Third Empire" really. I do agree though that this case is not cut and clear, open to further suggestions but until then my vote stands. Gryffindor 22:19, 5 December 2005 (UTC)

I have moved the page back to Estado Novo (Portugal). Kusma (talk) 19:22, 7 December 2005 (UTC)

Redirect[edit]

I redirected New State (Portugal) to this artice, since it appeared to be the same article with a different title. Estado Novo is the accepted term even in English. Benami 10:19, 8 January 2006 (UTC)

Estado Novo is Fascist not conservativsim[edit]

I am tired of seeing self-proclaimed anti-Fascists trying to mislead the reader by promoting this system as a "conservative authoritarianism" when it has always been recognised outside and inside Portugal throughout history as a Fascist doctrine following the same regime as Italy and Spain. Piecraft 12:48, 7 February 2007 (UTC) Strike-through text

Estado Novo not true fascism[edit]

Estado Novo in Portugal or Brazil are not generally characterized by scholars as fascist. They share some common elements and certainly were inspired in part by aspects of fascism but even parts of the New Deal had inspiration from fascist policies. There is a "taxonomical” difficulty in characterizing it as fascism; it is not fascism but at most a “para-fascism”. It is true of both Brazil and Portugal. They are not quite fascist, hence I am removing the template. Mamalujo 18:28, 30 November 2007 (UTC)

This is a tricky question, since the precise definition of fascism is subject to interpretation. However, even Hobsbawm, an acknowledged communist, and therefore highly critical of the regimes in Portugal and Spain, (e.g. in The Age Of Extremes) does not consider either regimes to be fascist per se (while some movements or currents such as the Spanish Falange certainly were, apparently these were increasingly marginalized within the regimes). Part of the argument against the fascist label is that both were more backward-looking, inherently conservative and reactionary, and ideologically closer to the Catholic church (or their impression of it). Clearly this is an argument that can bounce back and forth depending on a network of definitions, but certainly there is no scholarly consensus that the regime was actually fascist in a technical sense. In the looser everyday sense where the word "fascist" is often used as a (perhaps understandable) insult for far-right regimes then it was perhaps fascist, but this is inexact, and not very useful. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.111.174.46 (talk) 15:46, 16 February 2014 (UTC)

Reference to the Vietnam War and Afghanistan[edit]

This seems to be POV as it decries the ideologies of the USA and the USSR. I don't think that the comparisons are reasonable as, for one, the USA still exists, and two, the USSR suppressed protests and the state was replicating its actions in Czechoslavakia and Hungary (i.e. Prague Spring, etc) in trying to oust a government that was moving away from their control. I've rewritten it, please revert if you don't like it. --Wee Jimmy (talk) 17:25, 18 February 2008 (UTC)