Talk:Euboea

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Etymology of Euboea[edit]

Does anybody know the equivalent of it in Turkish? I couldnt find it out from the Greel Islands pages which contain Turkish equivalents? It is urgent. Thanks.

Ancient Greeks thought that the word "Eu-boea" derived from the words "Eu" (= good) and bous (= cow).

It is possible that the word "Eu-boea" is derived from the word "Abia". Abia was the land of a Greek tribe "Abantes" who migrated to Euboea from Illyria (or, from Epirus) and later, took part in Trojan War.

--IonnKorr 19:57, 30 October 2005 (UTC)

Euboic colonization to Sicily and Italy[edit]

There should be some discussion here about the migration of Euboean Greeks to southern Italy and Sicily. The history provided does not adequately describe this migration, which had siginificant repercussions in Eugoean history.

Nudas veritas 02:12, 28 November 2005 (UTC)

The arrival of the Arvanites in Negroponnte[edit]

I inserted relevant information as to the arrival in the 14th century of a substantila Tosk Albanian speaking population in Negroponte (as it was then called Euboea) who were later to be known under the generic name Arvanites. The then Venetian rulers of Negroponte had to cope with depopulation and introduced these sturdy Albanian farmers who to this day can be met in Cavo D'oro or (now re-baptized) Cape Kafireas area. Apostolos Margaritis 09:24, 3 March 2006 (UTC)

Directional Orientation of Satellite Picture[edit]

I know the title notes the South/West orientation of the photo but is it possible to resize and reoriented so it matches up better with the map? At first glance it is sort of confusing. Agne27 21:59, 16 June 2006 (UTC)

It would be the work of a moment to use a photo editor to rotate this image: why on earth hasn't this been done? It can't be for copyright reasons! --NigelG (or Ndsg) | Talk 19:55, 27 August 2007 (UTC)
Yes check.svg Done NE is now uppermost.

Oddity[edit]

"for supplying them with corn and cattle,"

This was under the section mentioning Pericles. If I'm not mistaken, there was no corn in Europe during Pericles's time.

In UK English corn is sort of a generic word for grain. In England and Wales it usually means wheat, in Scotland, oats (or so I've read). It is only in the U.S. and Canada that corn means maize. So yes, there was no maize in Europe, but there certainly was grain. 76.234.177.142 (talk) 18:47, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Evia / Euboea[edit]

Can someone explain if / why both these names are used for this island? The BBC seem to be using solely 'Evia' as the island's name? Dmn Դմն 07:04, 27 August 2007 (UTC)

It deals with the sounding and translation of the name from Greek to English. El Greco (talk · contribs) 16:13, 27 August 2007 (UTC)
Any idea how frequently 'Evia' is used in the english-speaking media and not Euboea? Dmn Դմն 21:33, 28 August 2007 (UTC)
It doesn't often appear in the news. But when it does, as at present when terrible forest fires have been raging there, the broadcast media soon settle on Evia, as reflecting the modern pronunciation. In print the spelling Euboea is often used—but Evia seems to be preferred: "fires evia" gets 228K google hits v. 54K for "fires euboea".
When writing about classical antiquity I imagine the spelling Euboea would almost always be preferred. --NigelG (or Ndsg) | Talk 22:10, 28 August 2007 (UTC)
Evia is the English direct translation from Greek. Euboea is the transliteration (taking Greek characters and writing them in English) from Greek to English. El Greco (talk · contribs) 23:22, 28 August 2007 (UTC)
Just to spell (!) things out more precisely: Evia is the transcription of the modern pronunciation. Euboea is actually the (traditional) latinized transliteration of the spelling Εὔβοια (the direct transliteration would be Euboia). The modern spelling is still Εύβοια (the "breathing" resembling a small comma is no longer used); but eu is now pronounced ev, b is v and oi is pronounced i: hence Evia. --NigelG (or Ndsg) | Talk 09:54, 29 August 2007 (UTC)
PS I've just had a look at the excellent article on the 2007 Greek forest fires, to which El Greco has been a major contributor. Congratulations, & thanks for all your hard work keeping us up to date. The animated satellite images are horrifying to anyone who loves Greece. --NigelG (or Ndsg) | Talk 10:06, 29 August 2007 (UTC)

I added {{pronunciation needed}}; I assume the English pronunciation is /juː'bɪə/, and Greek /'ɛvia/, but I'd rather leave the article editing to someone who knows for sure. No such user (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 06:47, 7 August 2009 (UTC).

Noel-Baker family[edit]

The British hellenophile Noel-Baker family have had a presence on the island at Konaki since 1832. The best-known member of the family was the politician and diplomat Philip Noel-Baker. The family should surely be mentioned in this article. At the same time the connection with Evia ought to be mentioned in the article on Baron NB. --NigelG (or Ndsg) | Talk 11:21, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

Medieval vs Modern[edit]

The fourth crusade is definitely medieval, and this should be moved under the medieval heading. "Sicilian" is not all that helpful in describing the force which destroyed the coastal towns: is 'Norman' meant? The heading 'Modern' should be Early Modern. And do we really need such a long description of a snowstorm when the fall of Negroponte to the Turks is passed over so quickly? 213.156.49.129 (talk) 13:40, 5 July 2008 (UTC)