Talk:Eurozone

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Add Switzerland to countries with pegged currency to Euro.[edit]

(Self-explanatory, the Swiss have tied the Franc recently) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Michal Lehuta (talkcontribs) 13:11, 6 September 2011 (UTC)

Not quite the case, Switzerland merely has a cap on its exchange rate. It just won't allow it to exceed 1.20, if it drops below that figure then the Swiss Central Bank won't intervene.- J.Logan`t: 09:19, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section. A summary of the conclusions reached follows.
The result of the discussion was: Do not move. Unanimously opposed. Withdrawn and closed by nominator per Wikipedia:Requested moves/Closing instructions

EurozoneEuro area – "Euro area" is the commonly used name in encyclopaedias, books, journals, official documents, etc. Its membership is authoritatively defined. --Boson (talk) 13:30, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

Evidence[edit]

Google is only a rough guide, of course, but I get the following hits

  • at Google Books:
    • 32,200 +"eurozone"
    • 44,100 +"euro zone" (including "euro-zone")
    • 102,000 +"euro area"
  • at Google Scholar (at least summaries, no patents)
    • 16,700 +"eurozone"
    • 17,800 +"euro zone" (including "euro-zone")
    • 40,800 +"euro area"

Both favour "euro area" by a wide margin.

Official usage is also "euro area". See the EU Interinstitutional Style Guide:

:"The term ‘euro area’ is the official term for the group of countries that have adopted the euro as their single currency. All other terms, such as ‘euroland’ and ‘euro zone’, should be avoided. "

European Union institutions are an authoritative source for membership of the euro area, but there are no equivalent authoritative sources defining membership of the "Eurozone" or "eurozone" or "euro zone" or "euro-zone.

News sources (possibly including non-reliable ones) seem to prefer combinations with "zone" but, in my opinion, this is journalese; it is my impression that some, at least, tend to use "euro area" when being more serious and "euro zone"/"eurozone" when being "chatty" or "snappy", or when the term is being or has been used in a headline (e.g. "EU leaders vow to fight contagion in the euro zone", as opposed to "European banks need the official help because the American money-market funds, on which they rely heavily to finance their dollar lending, have taken fright as the euro area’s sovereign-debt crisis has worsened . . ." [both from The Economist). --Boson (talk) 13:30, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

Opinions[edit]

Support as proposer. --Boson (talk) 13:30, 20 September 2011 (UTC) Withdrawn.--Boson (talk) 12:41, 24 September 2011 (UTC)

Oppose Your searches notwithstanding, I believe "euro zone" is more familiar than "euro area." I work for one of the largest media outlets in Canada, the CBC, and here "euro area" doesn't even make the style guide. Here is the entry on usage: euro, euros (European Community currency); Eurodollar (no hyphen), eurozone (lowercase and fused).The official name for the United Kingdom is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, yet we don't go with the "official" name on its page. The same should apply here. Canada Jack (talk) 14:45, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

Just to clarify: I am not proposing "euro area" because it is the official term per se. However, perhaps because it is the official term, it is formal and precise, making it more suitable (and in fact more common) where formality and precision are appropriate, as in encyclopaedias and other books. In that respect, it is more like preferring "United Kingdom" to "UK" (less formal) and "Britain (less precise), even if journalists prefer the shorter terms. One problem with "Eurozone" (partly because it is not the official term) is that is less clearly defined: it is unclear whether it includes all territories that use the euro or only those 17 states officially listed as comprising the euro area). --Boson (talk) 18:19, 21 September 2011 (UTC)
But "United Kingdom" is not the official name of the state, "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" is. If your example was to hold, we'd expect the long, formal form of the name there. But we don't. Canada Jack (talk) 19:08, 21 September 2011 (UTC)
Further, a quick look at the New York Times website reveals a near-exclusive use of the term "Euro Zone", mirrored by myriad other news sources. The main style issue, it would seem, is whether to have "euro zone" as one or two words, and whether to cap "euro." Canada Jack (talk) 20:11, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
Now that is a more interesting point. I punt for Eurozone as I see them joined far more than separate and although euro has to be lowercase, Eurozone is a proper noun in its own right.- J.Logan`t: 10:14, 21 September 2011 (UTC)

Oppose Seconded, Eurozone is far more familiar. You read the FT or watch a press conference and the term "eurozone" is far more common. You always have references to the "eurozone economy" and currency boards, if they don't say euro or EU, will say Eurozone before euro area. It would also create inconsistency: pretty much all references on Wikipedia are for Eurozone, but the article would be renamed something else. That would add to confusion which, on EU topics, is something we have enough of already. Maybe if we were starting out on scratch there would be an argument to be had but to be honest, I don't think it would be accurate or helpful to rename.- J.Logan`t: 16:33, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

  • Oppose based on my limited visibility. I don't know what it is, but BBC America uses eurozone a lot. Vegaswikian (talk) 19:40, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
  • Oppose Euro area? never 'eard of it. Eurozone is pervasive. --Ohconfucius ¡digame! 09:42, 21 September 2011 (UTC)
  • Oppose I would have to suggest that newspapers, rather than academic journals or text books, give a better impression of what constitutes English usage. On Google News I get 3,640 results for "euro area", 24,300 results for eurozone and 17,300 results for "euro zone". This numbers speak for themselves. As far as precision is concerned, I do see your point but it can be gotten over by describing places as being "informally" part of the eurozone and I don't think this is such a bad solution. — Blue-Haired Lawyer t 11:11, 22 September 2011 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.


Completing : Comparison table[edit]

Would it be possible to add other large economies to the comparison table for example : China, India, Brazil, Russia? I have no clue were to find the information. Thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.86.149.129 (talk) 07:12, 24 October 2011 (UTC)

Likely vandalism[edit]

Someone made an edit for Ireland which looks like vandalism to me, so I undid the revision. It looks as if the editor has his own interpretations of the borders of the Republic of Ireland. I'm sorry if I undid something which was supposed to be there. --Stefan2 (talk) 20:41, 24 October 2011 (UTC)

It is vandalism and you're quite right to revert. Northern Ireland is not in dispute since the Good Friday Agreement between the UK and the Republic.- J.Logan`t: 18:46, 25 October 2011 (UTC)

Frankfurt Group[edit]

I wonder if anyone could work out what to do with the existing Frankfurt Group page? The term has taken on a new meaning eg [1] [2] --Chuunen Baka (talkcontribs) 16:06, 16 November 2011 (UTC)

I've added Frankfurt Group (disambiguation) but don't feel qualified to create an article. --Chuunen Baka (talkcontribs) 16:29, 17 November 2011 (UTC)

potential Germany resource[edit]

Why Germany's success doesn't extend to other Eurozone countries "Trade and economic interaction happens with countries outside of the Eurozone as well." by Stefan Karlsson in Christian Science Monitor December 8, 2011 99.181.141.143 (talk) 00:56, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

Map Incomplete[edit]

As Special_member_state_territories_and_the_European_Union states,

  • Réunion
  • French Guiana
  • Martinique
  • Guadeloupe
  • Saint Barthélemy
  • Saint Martin
  • Mayotte Minimal
  • Saint Pierre and Miquelon
  • French Southern and Antarctic Lands
  • Azores
  • Madeira
  • Canary Islands
  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia

all uses euro and perhaps should be included in the map. ibicdlcod (talk) 03:09, 6 September 2012 (UTC)

Personally I think this would make the main map overly busy, but I wouldn't be opposed to a new section/map showing which overseas territories use the Euro. TDL (talk) 03:23, 6 September 2012 (UTC)

There are 3 maps in the article which are mostly similar. Is there really a need of having all these maps? I think it is more clear for the readers when all the data is shown in one map. --Dima1 (talk) 21:12, 15 January 2014 (UTC)

Map Incomplete II[edit]

  • The independent EU country Malta is not on the current map.
  • Andorra is not shown in the same colours as Kosovo and Montenegro.
  • Countries which have concluded formal agreements with the EU should have a third colour.

Agerskov (talk) 14:16, 15 November 2012 (UTC)

Adoption Rank[edit]

What does the Adoption Rank give in the member states table? I can't see what extra it gives over and above the joining dates.

Spudgfsh (talk) 21:06, 18 September 2012 (UTC)

Table Data[edit]

Not sure if a 2009 world bank page is the best source for data about the Eurozone GDP etc anymore. Would using something like this be better? http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/tgm/table.do?tab=table&init=1&language=en&pcode=tec00001&plugin=1 24.134.154.28 (talk) 09:26, 30 July 2013 (UTC)

SPAIN AND NETHERLANDS AMONG THE TOP 20 ECONOMIES Even if neither Spain nor the Netherlands are member states of the "G-20 Group", both are among the Top 20 World eocnomies. Spain is nº 13th and Netherlands is nº 18th. Read in Wikipedia the "List of countries by GDP (Nominal".--88.1.244.26 (talk) 18:26, 25 October 2013 (UTC)