Talk:Eva Perón

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Removal of "gallery" section[edit]

I have removed the gallery section of this article. The reason is as follows. First of all, this article is already heavily illustrated, and similar articles (such as the one about Che Guevara) do not have gallery sections. It's unnecessary. Second of all, some of the pictures in the gallery were not even of Eva Peron; one of them was of Patty Lupone portraying Eva Peron in the musical "Evita," and another image was simply of the theatre where the Broadway revival of the musical "Evita" is taking place. The gallery was unnecessary, and it will cost this article it's "Good Article" status if it remains. Copy Editor (talk) 04:18, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

Results of 1946 election never stated[edit]

Under the section headlined "1946 Presidential election victory" there is no mention of the victory. The entire section consists of saying Juan Peron decided to run for president and discussion of Eva campaigning for him. Sure, the result is implied in the headline, but as you read the text you are picturing the campaign and the results of that campaign are never discussed.

Then, never having mentioned the results of the election, the next section immediately begins with talk of Eva departing on a world tour, without the explicit connection being made that at that point she was the first lady of Argentina. Some discussion by a knowledgable person (not me) needs to cover the electoral victory and her newfound status as first lady. Kentucho (talk) 23:57, 29 November 2012 (UTC)

Nearly half of the citations are from the same source[edit]

"Fraser and Navarro" are cited thirty-odd times, and a lot of the article is cited with their work and no other citations. Even if they are a reliable source, other sources should be brought in, especially because of the sensitivity of the subject matter. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.237.251.57 (talk) 00:51, 3 December 2012 (UTC)

I know. Isn't it great that most of the quotes in the article come from the best, most objective, most well researched, and balanced biography on Eva Peron? And isn't it great that there are so many other references from other books and articles and websites as well? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.134.128.76 (talk) 18:06, 31 December 2012 (UTC)
What a joke! Reading that source it appears to me that Frazer and Navarro are describing a different country rather than the one I lived in during the whole period described. Discrepant articles are deleted from the text and references by its gate-keeper. See his YouTube clip69.9.27.73 (talk) 04:31, 16 March 20p13 (UTC)
That's because this is a researched work by historians, not the extremely biased view of someone who grew up in Argentina in an anti-Peronist family where people probably took the most outlandish hearsay about Eva Peron seriously. Julie M. Taylor writes in the book "Eva Peron: The Myths of a Woman" [1] that some of what the anti-Peronists believed about Evita was so outrageous that she couldn't believe they were repeating them to her with a straight face. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.211.119.178 (talk) 03:48, 19 October 2013 (UTC)

Regarding the original statement in this section: the sad reality is that there aren't many biographies about Eva Peron to begin with, and the book "Evita: The Real Life of Eva Peron" [2] is the only biography of Eva Peron written by a historian. Juan Peron is the one who has received more attention in academia and political science, whereas his more famous wife has usually been relegated to portrayals in popular culture. If you want a lot of other biographies of Eva Peron cited in this article, then please dig up the yellow journalism like "Evita: Sinner or Saint?" [3] and The Woman with the Whip. But such books are unintentionally hilarious. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.211.119.178 (talk) 03:53, 19 October 2013 (UTC)

"Early Childhood"[edit]

How old was Eva when her father, Duarte, passed away. And how do we know that: "Eva would never forget the bitter memory of having her mother and siblings thrown out of her father's funeral." This statement needs citation. — Preceding unsigned comment added by American In Brazil (talkcontribs) 22:35, 29 March 2013 (UTC)

Casa Rosada Demonstration[edit]

The section entitled Juan Perón's arrest includes the unsourced statement "At the time of Perón's imprisonment, Eva was still merely an actress. She had no political clout with the various labor unions that supported Perón ..." The article previously stated, in a sourced statement, that before meeting Perón, Eva Duarte "began her career in politics, as one of the founders of the Argentine Radio Syndicate (ARA)." It also says that, at the time of the arrest, Eva owned part of and co-managed a radio station, had a daily radio show, and was the president of the union to which all broadcast performers belonged. Presumably, her union presidency gave her a voice within whatever labor councils existed and her radio station and show and gave her direct access to the people. Someone with more knowledge than I of the period, and of Spanish, should reconcile these two diametrically opposed images of Eva Duarte in 1945. Johhtfd (talk) 17:49, 18 September 2013 (UTC)

Evita was fired immediately after Juan Peron was arrested. She wrote about this in her autobiography La Razon de mi Vida. She DID have clout while he was an officer; but she lost it all when he was arrested. Then she got it back when he was released ... and got even more when he was elected. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.211.119.178 (talk) 03:45, 19 October 2013 (UTC)