Talk:Even-Shoshan Dictionary

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References demonstrating (or at least suggesting) notability[edit]

Since I don't want to create an article that's only about how great/standard/well-known/etc. the dictionary is, but I do think that's relevant, I'm just going to list here some English-language third-party references that demonstrate this (or at least suggest it):

  • 1985, Werner Weinberg, The history of Hebrew plene spelling, Hebrew Union College Press, ISBN 9780878202058, page 80:
    It stands to reason that people who care to write plene by rules would choose the system found in the popular Even-Shoshan dictionary rather than look for rules hidden away in the LC publications on which it is “based.”
  • 2001, Ruti Kadish, Mothers and Soldiers: Israeli Lesbian and Gay Negotiations of Jewish, National, and Sexual Identity, University of California Berkeley, OCLC 49829237, page 155:
    The name is a play on the Hebrew equivalent of the Oxford dictionary — the Even Shoshan dictionary.
  • 2007, Anne Wagner et al., Interpretation, Law and the Construction of Meaning: Collected Papers on Legal Interpretation in Theory, Adjudication and Political Practice, Springer, ISBN 9781402053191, page 132:
    The widely recognized dictionary for Modern Hebrew, the Even-Shoshan Dictionary, gives the following definition for kli rexev: […]

Do with them what you will. (Sorry for the Wiktionary-style formatting; I don't really know what quotations from books are supposed to look like here.)

RuakhTALK 23:15, 29 April 2009 (UTC)