Talk:Evolution of human intelligence

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3 ways to improve article[edit]

1.This article need to discuss the evolution of the CNS and how neurons lead to the human consciousness 2.It should have a section explaining if the evolution of neurons came from a Monophyly linage, meaning the origin of neurons from a single ancestral cell lineage, or a polyphyletic orgin, an independent origins of neurons and complex brains among species in different lineages. This important to determining if neurons ultimately are the best tool to ensure species survival or just a random mistake. 3.This article should also go into more detail about the evolutionary selection toward a social brain and how the human species reliance on social exchange is a driving force of brain development. perhaps discuss the benefits of social exchange.

Bryant.1497 (talk) 03:22, 2 October 2014 (UTC)bryant.1497

Homininae section is bumpy and goofy[edit]

please rewrite.--Kid 007 (talk) 14:40, 24 December 2011 (UTC)

Completely agreed. Really the entire "History" section could use a revisiting. The following "Homo" section is equally awkward in its wording and "Homo Sapiens" is just a picture... A lot of it feels speculative and there are no citations for many of the claims.Milotoor (talk) 07:56, 9 September 2013 (UTC)

Wrong to remove "fallabilism and epigenetics" model.[edit]

"Fallabilism" means admitting mistakes and not believing in any infallability. The data on learning proving the importance of willingness to committ and admit mistakes to learn from is relevant to understand where the ability to learn came/comes from. Models of evolution based on sexual selection or social intelligence both predicts a strong unwillingness to committ and admit mistakes to learn from, making them directly counterproductive in explaining human intelligence. And the question of "why does epigenetics not have the same effect in other species" is misframed in the context. You could as well be asking why natural selection did not have the same effect in all life. Epigenetics is also context-dependent. Most animals are under too much time-stressing threat to take time to think while others, such as apes, are too entangled in social intrigue to afford committing and admitting mistakes to learn from. Human evolution can then be explained as the creation of social environments friendly to mistakes. See the article "Brain" on topic page "Psychology" on http://purescience.wikia.com The section should be reinserted into the article, possibly under a less cryptic heading. 109.58.218.46 (talk) 06:45, 7 February 2013 (UTC)Martin J Sallberg

The proposed section is original research. There are citations, but they do not back up the claims made. Where in the sexual / social selection literature is an unwillingness to admit mistakes predicted? Or a statement that "mistakes are too expensive to afford". These require careful citation. And if this is about "the creation of a social environment" friendly to mistakes, why is it not a special case of social selection?
I've put the deleted text below to facilitate discussion.Joannamasel (talk) 14:20, 7 February 2013 (UTC)
===Fallabilism and epigenetics===
The Darwinian uselessness of the high levels of human intelligence can be explained if the difference in intelligence between apes and humans is actually epigenetic rather than genetic.[1] This theory is supported by research showing the importance for learning of willingness to committ and admit mistakes to learn from,[2] neither of which can be selected by sexual selection or social brain selection since both sexual selection and social intelligence are about conditions where mistakes are too expensive to afford.

It is not social SELECTION because such a removal of intolerant intrigue requires simultaneous change in multiple individuals, as opposed to selection on random mutations that begins in only one individual. The scenario is something like a more thorough version of how the Forest Troop baboons became peaceful. 109.58.197.172 (talk) 15:27, 7 February 2013 (UTC)Martin J Sallberg

By the way... you don't happen to mean fallibilism? And apart from your discussion, I insist that these sentences are too technical for an ordinary reader to understand. Lova Falk talk 19:10, 7 February 2013 (UTC)

Neanderthals are not ancestors but companions[edit]

Though it IS true that many neanderthals mated with Cro-magnons leading to many in the modern day human population to in part have also descended from neanderthals. Neanderthals and Cro-magnons are different species which evolved around the same time from the same ancestor. So we didn't EVOLVE out off neanderthals.

Further I read somewhere that neanderthals had larger brain size but less off it was used for thinking(most for controlling their in-efficient bodies)as a result we are smarter, similar to how dolphins(while having a larger brain size) use around 80% of it for sonar and sound.

Neanderthal extinction could have been avoided by either a 25 rise or decrease in the Birth & death rates respectively. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 182.68.97.73 (talk) 16:27, 5 July 2013‎ (UTC)

Hi 182.68.97.73, and thank you for your comment! How exactly would you like to change the article? Lova Falk talk 08:20, 4 August 2013 (UTC)
Hi, Lova, I'm glad you are watching this article. I should remind our fellow editors about the Anthropology and Human Biology Citations source list I have posted for the use of all Wikipedians who have occasion to edit articles on human genetics and related issues. I happen to have circulating access to a huge academic research library system at a university with an active research program in these issues (and to other academic libraries in the same large metropolitan area) and have been researching these issues from time to time since 1989. I have just become a Wikipedia Visiting Scholar at another large research university, so I expect to be building up reference lists to share with you and other Wikipedians with the resources of that university library system for most of the rest of 2014. All Wikipedians are welcome to use these citations for your own research. You can help other Wikipedians by suggesting new sources through comments on that page. It will be extremely helpful for articles on human genetics to edit them according to the Wikipedia standards for reliable sources for medicine-related articles, as it is important to get these issues as well verified as possible. -- WeijiBaikeBianji (talk, how I edit) 13:01, 7 June 2014 (UTC)
    • ^ Eva Jablonka et al.: Four-dimensional evolution
    • ^ Kurt Fischer, Christina Hinton et al.: Mind, Brain and Education