Talk:FADEC

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Title as an acronym[edit]

I looked into this, and just wanted to document what I found for future editors. It appears that FADEC is a very common term, to the exclusion of the five-word version, in aviation documentation. Therefore, it appears to be ok to title the article "FADEC" because most people would simply refer to it as fadec (i.e. like radar). In keeping with this, I recently edited the lead in so that the first sentence is not an explanation of the acronym, but explains what is a FADEC. - Davandron | Talk 16:15, 26 March 2008 (UTC)

History[edit]

The second to last sentence in History ('The experiments led to Pratt & Whitney F100 and Pratt & Whitney PW2000 being the first military and civil engines, respectively, fitted with FADEC, and later the Pratt & Whitney PW4000 as the first commercial "dual FADEC" engine') should be supplemented by adding "FADECs for all three of these engine series were manufactured by Hamilton Standard." [1]

JLashnits (talk) 17:32, 9 November 2013 (UTC)

Acronym "incorrect"?[edit]

Previously, the lead in said that the acronym was incorrectly interpreted for the E to mean electronics. Looking at usage, I see both versions (engine vs electronic) in use in many companies' literature. For something to be incorrect, there has to be only one correct answer and it seems that both are used. If we can cite it from the inventors, I can see saying that it originally was engine, but I don't think that an alternate usage is in-itself wrong. - Davandron | Talk 16:19, 26 March 2008 (UTC)

I don't know whether the usage has changed but back in the 1960s/70s it stood for Full-Authority Digital Engine Control(ler). That was how it was written in Flight International magazine back then IIRC. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.40.249.242 (talk) 19:36, 5 November 2009 (UTC)
Here's a 1981 article on the DSIC (Dowty & Smiths Industries Controls) FADEC, including their originating of the term, in Flight magazine here: [1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.4.57.101 (talk) 16:26, 13 May 2012 (UTC)

FYI[edit]

I ended up here after reading an article in economics magazine this week about delay with A400M. Apparently everything else is ready, but FADEC for it is still no where near ready. It may be a couple of months before it come around.

Another small fact I picked there, apparently FADEC for this plane is 3 times as complicated as that of A380, and if A400M ever take off, it engines will be managed by the most complicated FADEC ever designed. Looks like there is serious reason for it to be late.

Only aviation?[edit]

Toyota's hybrid cars have had FADEC technology for several years now; the accelerator pedal only instructs the hybrid drive control computer, and not directly to any of the motors or the engine, and in many cases is ignored altogether (pressing the pedal while in neutral doesn't rev the engine.) Should this article be expanded to include modern automobiles? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.8.224.6 (talk) 14:31, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

  • No. FADEC is specifically an aviation term. It's only a FADEC if it's in an aircraft engine and if it meets the requirements. This includes various regulatory issues about how it handles various flight conditions and emergencies, what the computer controls and what it must allow the pilot to control. The term is not applicable to cars or any other type of vehicle that happens to contain a computer. Ikluft (talk) 00:53, 13 October 2009 (UTC)
  • I can't see anything inherently aviation related about this term, although aviation is definitely where it was first used, and is still most used. If Toyota are claiming that some of their cars have a FADEC system them it needs to go in the article.- (User) Wolfkeeper (Talk) 04:51, 13 October 2009 (UTC)