Talk:FLAC

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Android Support[edit]

The line "The Android operating system has supported native FLAC playback since version 3.1." Seems to imply that 3.1 was the first Android version to support FLAC. However, my current phone is running gingerbread (version 2.3x) which I assume is earlier than 3.1 and it supports native flac perfectly fine. Am I missing something here? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.229.105.189 (talk) 22:10, 19 August 2012 (UTC)

This may solve your doubts. --189.187.242.53 (talk) 02:51, 28 January 2013 (UTC)

More detail, continued[edit]

In my experience, FLAC files convert to cda files when ripped to a CD-R, but then 'bounce back into shape' and become FLAC files again (and thus lossless the whole time, I assume) when copied back to disc. If someone could explain that process a bit, that would be great. See the Compact Disc Audio track article, which should have similar info added to it. Thanks in advance. Anarchangel (talk) 23:39, 28 February 2012 (UTC)

Quality parameter[edit]

The article says: "FLAC allows for a Rice parameter between 0 and 16." I don't know what this means -- and it will be very obscure and unhelpful to the average reader.

It is important to offer readers a practical understanding of the quality parameter in common usage:

  • stackoverflow.com/questions/14655678/does-the-flac-audio-format-have-multiple-quality-settings
"The quality parameter for FLAC refers to the quality of compression, not audio. The audio will stay lossless but you get a better compression with higher quality. Higher quality will take more time to compress however.
See docs http://wiki.jriver.com/index.php/Encoding_Settings
Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC): FLAC is a popular lossless, freely available open source encoder. [2] Quality Settings: 0 - 8. Sets the quality of compression (and not sound, which is lossless), 8 meaning most compressed/time/effort."

These resources are relevant and helpful:

  • www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=94187
What differences among CUETools outputs? libFlake/libFLAC/flake/FLACCL, Moderation—derailed into a verbose discussion about compression levels
  • www.cuetools.net/wiki/CUETools_FLAC_encoders_comparison
" Compression levels
libFLAC has compression levels 0..8, where 0 is the fastest and 8 provides the best compression ratio. libFlake and FlaCuda are tuned differently, so libFlake -5 might in fact compress better than libFLAC -8. They also support additional compression levels 9-11, however their use is not recommended, because those levels produce so called non-subset files, which might not be supported by certain e.g. hardware implementations.
FLAC specifies a subset of itself as the Subset format. The purpose of this is to ensure that any streams encoded according to the Subset are truly "streamable", meaning that a decoder that cannot seek within the stream can still pick up in the middle of the stream and start decoding. It also makes hardware decoder implementations more practical by limiting the encoding parameters such that decoder buffer sizes and other resource requirements can be easily determined. flac generates Subset streams by default unless the "--lax" command-line option is used."

In sum, readers need to understand that the quality setting will affect how long the compression takes, will generally lead to a relatively small difference in compressed file size, have very little impact on decoding time, and not impact the "lossless" aspect at all -- unless taken to such an extreme that incompatibilities might arise. -96.237.4.73 (talk) 15:16, 12 February 2013 (UTC)

Inconsistency in compression rate[edit]

The article mentions twice a typical rate of 50-60%, and later it says "FLAC achieves compression rates of 30–50% for most music." anoko_moonlight (talk) 04:28, 18 March 2013 (UTC)

Do you mean it has to say 40-50% to be correct? C'mon +-10%. --Kays (talk) 22:28, 15 October 2013 (UTC)