Talk:Fahrenheit

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Disambiguation[edit]

Not sure how good an idea it is to have a disambiguation page here - have you looked at the multitude of pages that link here, all for the temperature scale meaning? Someone's going to have to fix all those links if this is to remain a disambiguation page. Mkweise 03:28 Mar 7, 2003 (UTC)

I agree and I'm moving it back. The graphics API is not at all famous enough to cause a reasonable ambiguity over the use of "Fahrenheit". --mav 03:51 Mar 7, 2003 (UTC)
Done. I gave the API a disambiguation block even though very few people will actually use it. --mav
while we're at it, there's Fahrenheit by Dior (kidding) -- Tarquin 10:44 Mar 7, 2003 (UTC)

Common usage[edit]

"However, despite official attempts to displace it, Fahrenheit remains in use for everyday, non-scientific temperature measurement by the general population of many English-speaking countries out of habit."

I think the sentence makes the assumption that America is the only english speaking country and because they still use fahrenheit the rest of the english speaking world does.

I find this statement to be misleading. I live in New Zealand and Fahrenheit is never used here. I dont think there would be many people in the population who have any idea what temperatures in Fahrenheit mean. ie. very few people would know at what temperature water froze in degrees fahrenheit.

Other than american tv shows and movies i never here any reference to temperatures measured in fahrenheit, so would believe that the opposite of the statement is true.

Im fairly certain this state of affairs is common with Australia.

--- any british commonwealth country (as in all of uk, new zealand, aus, several small pacific islands and large chunks of south africa) have all moved to metric only systems. america is one of a minority of countires who still use farenheit and imperial but studies show a distinct move off it. 203.219.85.18 (talk) 00:30, 7 June 2014 (UTC)

Common usage II[edit]

removed - "However, despite official attempts to displace it, Fahrenheit remains in use for everyday, non-scientific temperature measurement by the general population of many English-speaking countries out of habit."

As above. This does not hold true for much of the UK, and any of Australia or New Zealand. Additionally, virtually all non-english speaking countries use celcius. While I agree no critism is necessary/wanted or warrented of those countries which retain Fahrenheit, it's misleading to state the above.

Page name[edit]

Discussion moved to Talk:Units of measurement because it affects several units of measurement. bobblewik


99% of countries usa Celsius[edit]

I have reworded the sentence that contained the sentence "99% of countries". The "99%" is an over-estimate. If we countries in terms of UN memebership, the artcile cites four countries that use Fahrenheit, making 98% a more realistic number. If we work in terms of population, abput 5% of the world's population lives in the US. Moreover the sentence stated that this number of people changed to the Celsius scale durign the last part fo teh 20th century - not true - in many parts of the world, the Celsius scale was in use in the 19th century.-User:Martinvl (talk) 06:58, 27 February 2013

Second Paragraph - US Territories[edit]

The parenthetical exception in the second paragraph states that Puerto Rico predominantly uses Celsius. I believe this is mistaken, the temperature scale commonly used is Fahrenheit. It is the scale used for legislation, newspapers, as well as everyday use. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.227.8.126 (talk) 23:57, 15 July 2014 (UTC)