Talk:FeliCa

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Untitled[edit]

How do you pronounce FeliCa?


fairlica —Preceding unsigned comment added by 220.240.88.22 (talk) 03:53, 3 February 2008 (UTC)

Sony themselves seem to pronounce it like "Fell-ick-ah" in videos - although that I'm sure that others pronounce it like "Fel-eek-ah" (similar to the Toyota Celica).

95.149.171.31 (talk) 20:26, 19 January 2012 (UTC)

Totally unsafe?[edit]

The article does not have cryptanalysis info on this system. The fact it is externally powered is probably a weakness, because a maliciously modified reader could be manipulated to provide non-uniform power supply, probably instabilizing the card's chip and force it to produce somehow biased output.

I believe it is esentially impossible to make a secure payment card, because the algorithm + implementation combination will always have a hole somewhere. Nothing can be perfect in ths world and hackers will attack any weakness. 82.131.210.162 (talk) 09:24, 13 June 2008 (UTC)

What you are implying is completely wrong. Smart cards are not inherently unsafe, even with external power supply. In fact, newer smartcard models are especially designed to prevent a mulititude of sidechannel attacks, most of which would take an enormous amount of resources to do anyway (and involve physically opening the card, which in most cases destroys the cryptographic keys stored on the card because of countermeasures). Direct (software) attacks on the encryption are not likely to succeed either, as the old cards use Triple-DES (http://www.sony.net/Products/felica/business/products/RC-S860.html), and the new cards AES. See http://people.cs.uchicago.edu/~dinoj/smartcard/security.html for a list of some countermeasures usually built into smart cards. BTW, I am not the author of the page, I just wanted to correct your incorrect panicking about security on smart cards. 137.132.3.9 (talk) 16:37, 14 March 2013 (UTC)