Talk:Feminist movements and ideologies

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WikiProject Feminism (Rated C-class, High-importance)
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WikiProject Women's History (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
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title?[edit]

If you'd like to move this article to a new title, that's fine, except please do it soon before people get used to it where it is. The present title may be too hard to remember. I am making some redirects, so if this moves then they, too, should be edited, so they don't become orphans. This article's content came from the feminism article, which is being trimmed of excess length, and which has, or is about to have, a new link to this article. Thanks. Nick Levinson (talk) 22:16, 24 July 2010 (UTC)

additional movements or ideologies[edit]

There probably are more, as suggested by the article's sidebar. They weren't written up in the Feminism article from which this article's content was copied, but feel free to add descriptions of them. Thanks. Nick Levinson (talk) 22:16, 24 July 2010 (UTC)

Cite template style[edit]

Some Cite templates were spread over many lines. I collapsed them without removing their information to make the surrounding passages easier to read in the edit fields. I like white space but making one Cite template take about 8 lines seems too much.

A Cite template may have a URL followed by a pipe or a closing brace. While it's rare for a URL to include a pipe or a brace, I don't think they're illegal in URLs. This, I think, has the potential to confuse something, so I inserted a space after a URL whenever I noticed the problem. A space is illegal in a URL unless it's percent-encoded, so an unencoded space won't confuse.

Nick Levinson (talk) 22:16, 24 July 2010 (UTC)

antimodern feminism of 1920s U.S.[edit]

I was about to add about antimodern feminism but decided I wouldn't. Perhaps someone else would like to. While a book had quite a bit on it, apparently the author was the first to assign the meaning to the term and very few sources have picked up the term with the meaning since the 1999 book. I have not read the whole book, including chapters 3 and 4, which focus on it. Wikipedia has nothing on the term and Google had very little yesterday. Here's what I started:

Antimodern feminism was developed in the 1920s in the U.S. by Mary Austin and other White women who believed that the Pueblo Indians were living as a feminist utopia including women's equality,<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters: Feminism and Pueblo Cultures, 1879–1934 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press (Women in the West ser.), cloth 1999 (ISBN 0-8032-2586-5)), p. 2 & n. 4 and see passim, esp. chs. 3–4 & Conclusion (based on author's Ph.D. thesis, Univ. of California, Davis, per Engendered Encounters, id., p. [iv] (Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, on copyright p., or diss., Dep't of History, Univ. of Calif. at Davis, per Engendered Encounters, id., p. xi (Acknowledgments))).</ref> especially because of matrilineality and matrilocality leading to higher status for Pueblo women than White women had,<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., p. 72.</ref> although men were primary in governing pueblos,<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., p. 6.</ref> and these White women opposed<ref name="EngenderedEncounters-p2">Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., p. 2.</ref> earlier efforts by other White women to reform and "uplift" the Indians through assimilation into U.S. non-Indian society,<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., p. 1.</ref> part of a general movement to modernize the U.S.<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., pp. 2–3.</ref> The movement challenged the U.S. policy for the assimilation of Indians and led to a change in that policy.<ref name="EngenderedEncounters-p2" /> A criticism of antimodern feminism is that it encouraged non-Indians to believe Indians are monolithic, a belief continuing into modern times.<ref>Jacobs, Margaret D., Engendered Encounters, op. cit., p. 4.</ref>

Nick Levinson (talk) 21:34, 2 November 2013 (UTC) (Reworded phrase & reformatted post: 21:41, 2 November 2013 (UTC))