Talk:Fieldata

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Lozenge?[edit]

Character #62 is depicted as ¤ (currency sign), but called lozenge. Shouldn't it be ◊ U+25CA LOZENGE ? What was the glyph looking like in original computer output? rado 08:45, 27 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Huge influence[edit]

Much of the Fieldata system was the specifications for the format the data would take, leading to a character set that would be a huge influence on ASCII a few years later.

What is this huge influce Fieldata had on ASCII? --Abdull 17:26, 7 June 2007 (UTC)

Errors in table?[edit]

A way better article about FIELDATA can be found here: http://www.wps.com/projects/codes/index.html#FIELDATA Note also how the code tables differ. -- 212.213.204.99 01:11, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

So is it 6 bits or 7?[edit]

Make your mind up - either it's 6 bits (fitting 6 characters into a 36-bit word) with 64 code points, maybe 126 if there's a page-switch character ... or it's 7 (1+2+4, 128 codes, 5 characters in 35 bits with one left over). The page currently claims 6 but shows a 7-bit charset with a "supervisory bit", whatever that might be. Which is it? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.63.174.10 (talk) 12:48, 10 November 2010 (UTC)

Maybe there are two versions? 6-bit Fieldata without the "supervisory bit" (uppercase chars only), and 7-bit Fieldata with the "supervisory bit", enabling lowercase. Just an educated guess. – Wbm1058 (talk) 16:25, 19 October 2012 (UTC)