Talk:Fire piston

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Request photograph[edit]

Edward 11:28, 28 November 2006 (UTC)
I second that. Klosterdev 14:31, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

Physics of gases[edit]

I've removed a wildly oversimplifying (but also wrong) explanation of the heating effect that conflated temperature, momentum, and pressure, and linked to adiabatic process for those who are interested in the non-obvious details of why this actually works. -- The Anome 08:30, 11 June 2007 (UTC)

Factal Error[edit]

I removed this "By using the right sort of tinder a pressure of only about 3 pounds-force per square inch (20 kPa) will allow the tool produce a glowing coal." I author may have ment 3 pounds force on the piston. Note this article specifies the fire piston has a compression ratio of 25 to 1. theis means we have 24 atmosphears thats somthing like 1260 psi guage pressure. 3 psi is not even remotly close.68.83.199.209 (talk) 23:52, 2 November 2008 (UTC)


Also changed compression ratio of gasoline engine from 8:1 to 10-11.5:1 8:1 was the compression ratio of very early gasoline engines, but even rather antique developements obtained 9,5:1 or 10:1 compression ratio with high octane gas. Modern gasoline engines have 10:1 to 11,5:1 compression ratios. Note that this is geometric compression ratio. Actual dynamic compression ratio may vary. Turbo or supercharged engines have 8:1 or 8,5:1 or 9:1 geometric compression ratios, depending upon super/turbocharging pressure. —Preceding Marco comment added by 88.43.230.194 (talk) 08:33, 16 July 2010 (UTC)

Ancient origin: citation needed[edit]

I've been able to find no evidence backing up the idea that the fire piston is of ancient origin. Pretty much all information I've been able to find online seems to derive from the Wyatt R. Knapp article linked by this article, which describes it as an "Ancient Firemaking Machine" in its title but describes nothing earlier than its invention by Europeans in the early 19th century, and their discovery of its use in Southeast Asia in the same century. I've been able to find no reports of either earlier historical record of the device and no reports of them being found in archaeological digs. So if someone has such evidence, please cite it. Otherwise we should strike the claim of it being of ancient origin. --Ericjs (talk) 21:10, 24 February 2012 (UTC)