Talk:Fishing rod

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I suspect this text came from the 1911 Encyclopedia. Someone who fishes might want to take a look at it and see if it needs updating. --KQ 19:09 Jul 29, 2002 (PDT)

  • I know one thing - it is outdated. Most rods today are made of synthetic materials. -- April 12:18 Jul 31, 2002 (PDT)

Removed the following outdated text. -- April

Fishing rods are now usually made from the bamboo, the Calcutta reed, or of ash wood, as it is necessary they should be made light, tough, and pliable. The butts are frequently made of maple, with bored bottom; and this butt will outlast several tops. Rods for travelers are made in joints, so as to be easily transported. Some of them are made to be used as a walking cane until needed for sport. A perfect rod should gradually taper from end to end, be tight in all its joints, and be equally and uniformly pliable, not bending in one place more than another. Fishing rods vary from 12 to 20 feet in length.

I'm going to add an amended version of the above back into the article, as it provides a valuable historical perspective on fishing rods. Marktaff 20:59, 3 March 2006 (UTC)

Fishing rod[edit]

THE REFERENCE TO A BARBED HOOK AT THE END OF THE LINE IS UNNECESSARY AND MISLEADING. A HOOK OR LURE WOULD BOTH BE APPROPRIATE. THE REFERENCE TO A BARBED HOOK IGNORES THE FACT THAT AN INCREASING NUMBER OF SPORTS FISHERMAN ARE SUBJECT TO 'CATCH AND RELEASE' REGULATIONS AND FOR THIS REASON, OR SIMPLY FOR THE SPORT, FISH WITH BARBLESS HOOKS.

Fishing-guns[edit]

What about those amazing air-powered whatchamajiggers that FIRE the hook out from the rod? Those are awesome.

Yes, I haven't seen ones that fire out of the rod as such, but I have seen the remarkable Dewhurst fishing cannon which fires the line (hook, line and sinker) 300 metres, using compressed air. --Geronimo20 (talk) 18:41, 12 December 2008 (UTC)

Fishing Rod 'Action'[edit]

I'd like to revise this section, changing the title to "Rod Classifications", make both 'Action' and 'Speed' subsections (leaving them essentially the same,) and adding sections about line weight and lure weight ratings. I'm going to begin drafting it this week in my user area. Feedback on the idea? LaughingVulcan 00:59, 23 May 2007 (UTC) Made the edit. Section is now Rod specifications

Rod materials[edit]

Is it me, or is there just a little dislocation between all the different uses of rods (i.e. Fly, Ice, etc.) and "Carbon fibre"? Should there be a separate section on rod materials (cf, fiberglass, graphite, bamboo, others???), and a section on rod uses (angling, fly, ice, etc...) Or would that get too confusing? LaughingVulcan Laugh With Me / Logical Entries 04:33, 31 May 2007 (UTC)

Bait casting rod?[edit]

A bunch of the other rod types mention being similar or whatever to a bait casting rod. But what is a bait casting rod? Lollerskates (talk) 20:18, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

METRIC AND IMPERIAL MEASURMENTS[edit]

ITS THE 21st Century Folks!!! So for a good artical metric measurments should be used throughout....However, due to the history of the sport, inclusion of imperial measurments is still appropiate.....But both be used consistantly,....just not one and then the other at different stages in the article....its makes for a poor article otherwise.... —Preceding unsigned comment added by MACHINAENIX (talkcontribs) 14:45, 17 March 2009 (UTC)


SIMPLE FISHING ROD. Hi. In my Grandfather's village in WEstern Ireland, the locals used to go out into the harbour using just a plank of wood with four to six lines, with hooks and weights attached. If they found a school underneath, which they were good at doing, they could bring back all the hooks loaded with fish at one time. This is a picture of one I found on some archaeology site (I think) http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/claremuseum/riches_of_clare/water/fishing_board.htm but I know they were in practice at least as late as the early nineties because I saw it myself. So, basically, is there a name for this type of fishing device, and for this kind of fishing. If you know, please reply here. Also, it might make an addition to this article. Thanks, Simon —Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.97.217.134 (talk) 10:26, 28 May 2009 (UTC)

Implied US perspective in History section[edit]

"Until the mid-1800s rods were generally made in England." This statement makes no sense until you realize the implied American perspective (rods _sold and used in the United States_ were generally made in England"). The whole section, in fact, is US-centric and should be marked as such or rethought/rewritten as part of a broader history of the fishing rod. Travcurrit (talk) 14:31, 26 May 2014 (UTC) travcurrit