Talk:Flammability limit

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Flammable limits and explosive limits are the same thing. See D. A. Crowl and J. F. Louvar, Chemical Process Safety: Fundamentals with Applications, 2nd ed., Prentice Hall: NY, 2002.

Also, flammable limits are defined only for air. They are normally at 1 atm and 25oC.

LeChateliers rule is only an approximation. It works reasonably for the LFL and less well at the UFL.

The mole fraction in LeChateliers rule is a mole fraction calculated with other non-flammable gases, such as oxygen and nitrogen, excluded. --Engineerche (talk) 00:59, 16 March 2008 (UTC)

Too Many Examples?[edit]

The table of examples is growing at a rather rapid rate and now seems to becreatijng am imballance in the article as it seems to be becoming a reference table rather than a few examples to illustrate the main text. Shouldn't this listing be cut down in size? Or failing that shouldn't there be citations for each assertion in the table? Pzavon (talk) 01:00, 6 February 2009 (UTC)


I'd like to see the flammability limits stated as GRAMS of fuel per cubic meter of air, rather than percentages; as that ratio is open to speculation - being 3% - is that by way of the volume or the weight of vapor OR the initial weight of the fuel vaporised into the air etc.; and some fuels being liquid OR gas in their fundamental states, complicates the scenario.

Having the grams of fuel per cubic meter of air; is a defined ratio.

—Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.1.214.106 (talk) 02:11, 12 June 2009 (UTC)

High pressure effect[edit]

Many years ago when working in oil field engineering I saw a graph showing the UEL for CH4-air rising to around 50% at high pressures (say, 1000+ psi). Can anybody verify this and put up a citable reference? Casey (talk) 13:17, 28 September 2011 (UTC)