Talk:Floating point

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Error in diagram[edit]

The image "Float mantissa exponent.png" erroneously shows that 10e-4 is the exponent, while the exponent actually is only -4 and the base is 10. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.85.65.228 (talk) 12:14, 22 January 2014 (UTC)

needs simpler overview[edit]

put it this way, I'm an IT guy and I can't understand this article, there need to be a much simpler summery for non tech people, using simple English. Right now every other word is another tech term I don't fully understand. -- thanks, Wikipedia Lover & Supporter

It seems that Mfwitten removed that simple overview. Perhaps, to enforce the WP:ROWN. He called this "streamlining". I have recovered mine affair, additionally reducing the 'bits part'. Yet, I am sure, IT department will be happy now. --Javalenok (talk) 18:56, 17 February 2015 (UTC)

Failure at Dhahran - Loss of significance or clock drift[edit]

This article states in section http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_point#Incidents that the Failure at Dhahran was caused by Loss of significance. However, the article "MIM-104 Patriot" makes it sound like it was rather simply clock drift. This should be cleared up. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.198.218.209 (talk) 14:01, 3 December 2014 (UTC)

I agree. It isn't a loss of significance as defined by Loss of significance. It is an accumulation of rounding errors (not compensating each other) due to the fact that 1/10 was represented in binary (with a low precision for its usage). In a loss of significance, the relative error increases while the absolute error remains (almost) the same. Here, it is the opposite: the relative error remains (almost) the same, but the absolute error (which is what matters here) increases. Vincent Lefèvre (talk) 00:49, 4 December 2014 (UTC)

John McLaughlin's Album[edit]

Should there be a link to John McLaughlin's album at the top in case someone was trying to go there but went here?2602:306:C591:4D0:AD55:E334:4141:98FA (talk) 05:49, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

Done. Good catch! --Guy Macon (talk) 07:05, 7 January 2015 (UTC)