Talk:Flowers on the Wall

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Untitled[edit]

Isn't the song just called Countin' Flowers on the Wall'?

The song is also known as "Flowers on the Wall". Rlquall 01:04, 13 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Cleanup[edit]

This page really needs a re-write; almost every sentence begins with "the". TenPoundHammer 01:24, 4 April 2007 (UTC)

I never go the impression he was depressed at all...I thought he was just an oddball hermit, who is explaining to a concerned neighbor not to worry about him, he's perfectly happy. Czolgolz 00:12, 17 May 2007 (UTC)

I always read it as the guy claiming to be happy in his padded cell because he's too proud to admit how miserable he is. D. J. Cartwright (talk) 14:03, 26 March 2008 (UTC)

Where does the "Padded Cell" thing come from? --jpgordon∇∆∇∆ 18:39, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

I always got that impression from the line, "And my shoes are not accustomed to this hard concrete." D. J. Cartwright (talk) 14:03, 26 March 2008 (UTC)
  • I have always gotten the impression that the chorus was a thinly-veiled cry for help.

The song refers to an insane asylum[edit]

The person in the song is in an insane asylum; “Flowers on the wall” refers to a padded cell. “Smoking cigarettes and watching Captain Kangaroo, don’t tell me I have nothing to do” refers to the patient neglect in years past. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.193.64.106 (talk) 19:38, 13 September 2007 (UTC)