Talk:Folk art

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Frida?[edit]

Frida Kahlo is in the list of notables, but she wasn't a folk artist, rather she drew on Mexican folk traditions to express the personal subject matter of her work. She doesn't really belong in the list. Julia Rossi (talk) 06:57, 18 December 2008 (UTC)

I concur. — SMcCandlish   Talk⇒〈°⌊°〉 Contribs. 03:15, 11 February 2012 (UTC)

Rewrite[edit]

I'll do some basic homework on folk art, like the Bullfinch cited, and try and make a decent article. I'm by no means an expert. The information I added to the introduction is from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/212096/folk-art. It looks like Folk dance and Folk music have their problems too. Hopefully more improvements to come soon.

Rashad9607 (talk) 21:42, 14 June 2009 (UTC)

Notables[edit]

I removed the list of notables. Some were not folk artists but researchers, others were artists but not folk artists. Either way, I would like to see those names included contextually in the article and placed in an appropriate list. Also it is my understanding that most folk art is anonymous. Anyways, the list is here, waiting to be worked in.

Rashad9607 (talk) 21:48, 14 June 2009 (UTC)

Hi Rashad9607 - I agree the list of notables could be improved, but I would have liked the list to remain in the article until we make those improvements. Iterate and improve. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rolfedh (talkcontribs) 02:17, 22 May 2010 (UTC)
Names (some names at least) should be included in the article. Should be 'most notable examples' if possible, to aid those who want to see styles/differences etc, or want to start further research. Incidentally I found the article with 3 sections (Antique folk art, Characteristics, Contemporary folk art). The order was not logical (the Characteristics being a general description rather than a follow-on about Antique type), so I'll amend this to (Charact..., Antique..., Contemporary...). Pete Hobbs (talk) 15:22, 7 August 2011 (UTC)

Definition issues[edit]

I feel like the term "folk art" is a misnomer and one that has been at the heart of the "battle" between folklorists and fine arts scholars - a debate that should be highlighted in the article. To the folklorist, folk arts or traditional arts (see also cultural art) involve the intimate transmission of the artistic form from person to person (this could be within a family or community). Some fine arts scholars have adjusted their terminology, replacing "folk art" with the more appropriate terms "outsider art," "self-taught art" or "naive art." Using "folk art" in the context of this article is outdated and should be amended. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Folk smith (talkcontribs) 16:37, 29 October 2010 (UTC)

I'm working on this article, either creating a new article on "American Folk Art" or a chapter within the Folk Art article. I'll draw a lot from Eugene W. Metcalf's essay published in the exhibition catalogue for "Contemporary American Folk, Naive, and Outsider Art: Into the Mainstream? (Miami University Art Museum, Oxford, Ohio 1990) as well as from Paolo Bianchi, especially the chapter on Folk Art in the Kunstforum Outside USA I (1991). Bianchi is calling upon this very problem you are pointing out and recommends to limit the term American Folk Art to popular arts in the US created between roughly 1750-1900 or a little later. will take some time but I'm on it... --VickiAnderson (talk) 08:00, 22 May 2014 (UTC)