Talk:Forward secrecy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Cryptography / Computer science  (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Cryptography, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Cryptography on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Computer science (marked as High-importance).
 
WikiProject Internet (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Internet, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the internet on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Comment of 28 April 2006[edit]

User:Bassistphysicist added the claim "The current hope for perfect forward secrecy is hyper-encryption." I'm not an expert on this issue, but it seems to me that re-negotiating the session keys every once in a while (as in Off-the-record messaging) does already satisfy properties of 'perfect forward secrecy', so we don't need "hope" - it's already here. Thus, I decided to revert the edit for now. -- intgr 22:08, 28 April 2006 (UTC)

I think re-negotiating keys "once in a while" can not be the base of perfect forward secrecy. So, let's say, we re-negotiate once in 10 seconds. We use a connection for one second, then stop using it, and completely loose control over the connection at this point, and know, for the example, an adversary is able to fully control the connection including both end points from now. Now, should I worry about what the adversary can do during the next nine seconds - that is, gain information about the data transfered in the previous second? At least, I'm positive that in this kind on algorithm "once in a while" does not work, fundamentally. Volker Siegel (talk) 04:39, 9 March 2014 (UTC)

How does this definition match towards A. Perrigs definitions given e.g. here: http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~adrian/projects/sec/node6.html Is the forwards secrecy here the same as backward secrecy there and ist PFS here the same as forward secrecy there? His naming is more intuitive...84.75.118.97 08:32, 30 September 2007 (UTC)

Broken Link[edit]

Broken link: reference [2] —Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.176.178.209 (talk) 06:33, 9 June 2009 (UTC)

The proper links seem to be http://atis.org/glossary/definition.aspx?id=3185 and http://atis.org/glossary/definition.aspx?id=5189. –134.60.1.151 (talk) 13:14, 25 November 2010 (UTC)

appears completely random[edit]

Why "appears" ?? An OTP REQUIRES that random data is used. Even the word "completely" is superfluous as there is no incomplete randomness. If something is not "completely" random it is NOT random. So in my opinion instead of "appears completely random" it should be "is random". Sorry, but our societys language seems to be more influenced by advetising bla bla than by scientific accuracy. JB --92.195.72.160 (talk) 14:16, 9 April 2014 (UTC)

It's talking about the ciphertext -- the output of OTP after encryption. There is information encoded in the ciphertext, but it nevertheless looks random. I think "appears" is appropriate given that, but I don't feel strongly either way. -- intgr [talk] 18:21, 9 April 2014 (UTC)

Timeless History[edit]

The history section doesn't contain any dates. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.119.134.123 (talk) 16:40, 22 May 2014 (UTC)

Attacks ?[edit]

This whole section looks like WP:NOR to me... --Webwizard (talk) 19:48, 2 July 2014 (UTC)

Tag it with {{original research|section}} if you like. davidwr/(talk)/(contribs) 01:26, 6 July 2014 (UTC)