Talk:Four Books and Five Classics

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I Agree[edit]

Yes, I believe that the Four Books articleshould be merged with the Five Classics article. After all, they are a set of related Chinese classics. Sungrad (talk) 23:57, 14 December 2008 (UTC)

I agree with Sungrad. Such a merger would simplify things. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.102.49.119 (talk) 08:48, 5 May 2009 (UTC)

Proposed merge[edit]

I propose that this article be merged with Thirteen Classics to form an article called "Confucian classics", giving a narrative with sections "Five Classics", "Thirteen Classics" and "Four Books". This would be different from Chinese classics, which also includes non-Confucian works. Kanguole 18:31, 2 March 2012 (UTC)

The phrase "Four Books and Five Classics" is very recognizable within Chinese literature, and it is a well-known canon. Whereas I think the term "Confucian classics is too broad, and the article Chinese classics already pertains to this idea.--Sevilledade (talk) 12:11, 11 May 2012 (UTC)
The Four Books and Five Classics are indeed well-known canons, as is the Thirteen Classics, which were an expansion from the Five Classics and from which the Four Books were selected. I'm saying that they're aspects of the same topic, and that to cover that topic properly one would want to discuss the evolution of this canon from the Six Classics, then the Five Classics, gradually expanded through to the Kaicheng Stone Classics and the Thirteen Classics, followed by Zhu Xi's selection of the Four Books. As I said above, Chinese classics is broader, also including non-Confucian works. Kanguole 15:05, 11 May 2012 (UTC)


Drop reference to editing by Confucius[edit]

The line reading "These books, or parts of them, were either commented, compiled, or edited by Confucius himself" should be dropped. This tradition is not accepted by modern scholars. See, for example, Michael Nylan, The Five "Confucian" Classics (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001). ~entenman