Talk:Four Chaplains

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editing[edit]

I removed this paragraph from the main article, since the personal experiences of Radioman Third Class "I" (who is not me) are not encyclopedia material.

Many Coast Guard men risked their lives rescuing close to 200 survivors or more from the icy water. The Coast Guard ships were the USCG Tampa, The USCG Escanaba and the USCG Comanche. I was a radioman 3rd class on the USCG Comanche and witnessed many of the brave rescues that night. Most of the survivors were covered with diesel fuel and close to unconciousness. We stripped them of their clothes and rubbed their bodys to restore circulation. There is no doubt of the Chaplains courage in passing their life preservers to others, but many young coast guard men risked theirs also in the saving of survivors.

--the Epopt 23:21, 8 Jan 2004 (UTC)

The Chapel[edit]

The Chapel of Four Chaplains 1201 Constitution Avenue Philadelphia Naval Business Center, Building 649 Philadelphia, PA 19112 Telephone: 215.218.1943 Fax: 215.218.1949

Scouts[edit]

Another plan for the future is the memorial chapel for which a site has been cleared, but which will not be started this Summer. To honor the late Rabbi [Alexander D.] Goode, one of the four chaplains who gave up their life preservers to others and thus perished in the sinking of the Troopship S. S. Dorchester during the war, members of the Jewish fraternity raised about $15,000 for the chapel. Rabbi Goode, a former York Clergyman, and Scout leader of Troop 37, was active in youth work.

http://www.yaac-bsa.org/camping/tuckahoe/Camp%20Tuckahoe%20History.pdf --evrik 20:10, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

Photos[edit]

--evrik 21:06, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

Missing[edit]

There is an important omission: There was a wall of names of citizens who were honored for their civic service in a church chapel just north of Philadelphia's City Hall, on Broad St. In early 1951, this was known as The Chapel Of The Four Chaplains. I, Robert Parham, have a certificate of membership for my work with juvenile gangs in Philadelphia in the early 1950s. I believe that most, if not all, chapels were subsequent to the establishment of this chapel. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.116.91.246 (talkcontribs) 13:29, 24 December 2007

Why is the four chaplains memorial sculpture and park in Sebastian Florida not mentioned anywhere? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:30B:8202:1869:B05F:C4AE:F5B1:E92E (talk) 02:40, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

Knights of Columbus Council[edit]

Not sure if it's notable enough to include or not, but there was a Knights of Columbus Council called the "Four Chaplains Council" established a few years ago at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. umrguy42 20:49, 3 February 2009 (UTC)

Scottish Rite Masonry[edit]

The article states that the 23rd Degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry is based on the self-sacrifice of the Four Chaplains. I find this hard to believe, as the Scottish Rite achieved its current form in the nineteenth century. J S Ayer (talk) 05:16, 26 March 2009 (UTC)

The Scottish Rite rituals have been several times revised and rewritten. Please examine the list at this link:http://www.aasrcleveland.org/aasr/wisr.htm The Four Chaplains degree (under the old title of Chief of the Tabernacle) most certainly exists as I have participated in it. Saxophobia (talk) 17:44, 26 March 2009 (UTC)

I yield; I am not a Freemason, and was under the impression that the ritual had been frozen. Thank you! J S Ayer (talk) 17:54, 26 March 2009 (UTC)

The masonic ritual has been altered from time to time and it differs from country to country and state to state. Many longer lectures have been shortened or the material has been made optional. It would appear that modern Brothers can't or won't give time to memory work.Saxophobia (talk) 16:55, 30 March 2009 (UTC)

The Chaplains' Medal[edit]

I have corrected the information on the authorization of the medal, from the reference given. And that information, about the actual presentation of the medals to family, I have confirmed in a non-encyclopedic way - email to and from a relative of one of the chaplains who spoke with one of the family members who received the medal, confirming the actual presentation data. --Dumarest (talk) 15:34, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

I have a question - according to this article, the medal has not been awarded to anyone other than those for whom it is named. However, the article about Joshua L. Goldberg states that he received the "Four Chaplains Award" in 1956. Is this a different award, or is one article wrong? Jedikaiti (talk) 17:52, 11 November 2011 (UTC)
Different Award. The medal here comes from Congress. The Four Chaplains Award is presented by the civilian organization created in their name. NearTheZoo (talk) 18:06, 11 November 2011 (UTC)

This was a one-time Congressional award. I have edited to reflect that fact; It shouldn't say no additional medals have been awarded as of today's date, because the medal was a one-time, unique award. Also, with respect to its name, it really doesn't have an "official" name, the title of the article on the medal is Four Chaplains' Medal.--Nyctc7 (talk) 07:26, 18 September 2012 (UTC)