Talk:Fracture

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Earlier comments[edit]

Wow, this has been a big month for this article. Good job, guys! Would someone care to mention transgranular vs. intergranular? I used to know this, but I've forgotten a lot and don't want to embarrass myself writing false information.--Joel 22:13, 2 Jun 2005 (UTC)


I strongly feel against what Mbuehler had added laterly. apparently he/she was promoting his/her own work, not to introduce knowledge to the public.— Preceding unsigned comment added by Hhspiny (talkcontribs) 03:05, 22 July 2005 (UTC)

Rupture[edit]

What is refered to here as "Ductile Fracture" is what I know as "Rupture." The topics are sufficiently different that I think a seperate rupture article should be started and the ductile fracture stuff moved there. --Yannick 01:40, 2 December 2005 (UTC)

Agreed —BenFrantzDale 05:45, 2 December 2005 (UTC)

Fracture in geology[edit]

Does fracturing in geology include information that isn't in this article? A lot of geological articles are linked here. -- Kjkolb 09:35, 14 December 2005 (UTC)

I made a new article, Rock fracture, to address the specific context of fractures in geology. I'll try and re-direct geology related links there; and please, contribute to that article. +mwtoews 03:23, 14 September 2006 (UTC)

Different formula for critical stress[edit]

Hi there, I am looking at the formula for critical stress required for crack propogation in this article and it does not match what I have in my college text book.

I have not figured out how to use greek letters yet, but basically the formula I have is

(Critical Stress)=sqrt(2*(Modulus of elasticity)/(specific surface area)/(Pie*(half crack length)))

This formula is according to William D Callister Jr, in his book Materials Science and Engineering.

I actually like the formula given by wikipedia a little bit better because it includes the radius of the crack tip in the calculation, however I think that it might be appropriate to include this alternate formula which, eleminates the interatomic distance as well as the crack tip diameter as well so as to be a little bit more complete.

But this is my first time ever typing into wikipedia, so I was just wondering what all you other experts in material science think about this idea? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Hobojaks (talkcontribs) 03:32, 27 March 2007 (UTC).

Need for Scanning Electron Microscopy Images[edit]

This article could be improved greatly by including Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM) images of the the fracture surface discussed in the paper.— Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.22.154.194 (talkcontribs) 17:13, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

PUT MORE CONTENT[edit]

I FEEL THAT THIS ARTICLE NEEDS MORE CONTENT. IT DOES NOT MEET MY STANDARDS. FOR EXAMPLE, TELL MORE ABOUT BONE FRACTURES.ItsJodo (talk) 04:01, 18 March 2008 (UTC)

That has a seperate article.--Perspire and breathe (talk) 14:14, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

Info needed please[edit]

It's great that you list examples for each type of fracture, but thats not really explaning. Please revise this page. Thanks--Apple (talk) 08:50, 15 May 2008 (UTC)

Merged from Talk:Rupture (engineering) on 16 September 2010[edit]

Cup-and-cone[edit]

I'm not sure saying that it results in a rough surface is accurate. This statement kind of implys a brittle fracture. More description of a cup-and-cone failure might be more desirable for this article.132.170.7.254 14:42, 23 March 2007 (UTC)Ryan

Definition[edit]

A work-hardening ductile part will fail suddenly when the engineering stress–strain curve starts going down. Is this what rupture is trying to describe? —Ben FrantzDale

Why "local"?[edit]

"A fracture is the (local) separation of an object or material into two, or more, pieces under the action of stress." Could someone kindly defend the inclusion of "(local)" as we can cite many examples where fracture goes way beyond "local". Bobkiger (talk)bobkiger —Preceding undated comment added 16:52, 13 April 2011 (UTC).

nanotu...[edit]

Brittle fracture in glass picture has same looks as nanotubes fabric. r u sure its glass? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 188.25.50.165 (talk) 22:14, 25 April 2012 (UTC)

Missing graph[edit]

The article says that the breaking strength "is the maximum stress on the true stress-strain curve, given by point 1 on curve B". I see no curve B. JonH (talk) 09:52, 25 May 2013 (UTC)