Talk:Frankincense

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Untitled[edit]

The feature "What links here" offers many hints for improving and wikifying this entry. --Wetman 17:26, 12 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Herodotus information incorrect?[edit]

I am preparing to remove the Herodotus information. I don't know where this comes from. The "winged serpent" account can be found in Herodotus II,74-76 but contains no mention of frankincense. Herodotus II,73 relates the story of the Phoenix which flies from Arabia carrying a ball of myrrh to the Temple of the Sun in Egypt. Could this be the source of confusion? Alcmaeonid 13:23, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

Found the reference and modified the text accordingly. Alcmaeonid 14:34, 30 August 2007 (UTC)
When reading of Herodotus 3:107 I thought he meant that the Arabians burnt storax resin as in the resin of the sweetgum (Genus:Liquidambar)tree rather than the styrax (Genus:Styracaceae) tree. Sweetgum is definitley found in the middle east is/was styrax? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.147.181.166 (talk) 21:47, 18 October 2007 (UTC)

Oil -> Petroleum?[edit]

Why You corrected Oil -> Petroleum? It is not "petrol"! Alexandrov 13:28, 27 February 2006 (UTC)

On the name[edit]

The Arabic word of milk is laban not lubāan. Unless this is verified as the pronunciation in a local dialect or the Shehri language, then the Arabic etymology described as "which is derived from the Arabic al-lubán ("the milk") a reference to the milky sap tapped from the Boswellia tree" is not correct. --Alif 19:59, 27 July 2006 (UTC)

What deritualisation of religion?[edit]

Do you have a footnote for that assertion? I'm not saying that its wrong, but strikes me as odd. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Jleecbd (talkcontribs) 21:41, 20 January 2007 (UTC).

I added the {{fact}} tag. Stale Fries 03:04, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Removed Frankincense as a fictitious name[edit]

I removed the "Frankincense as a fictitious name" section, as it provided very little to the article, and was something more suited to the article page for the movie it referenced. Stale Fries 03:01, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Common v. 'odorous'[edit]

I read in Cooley's Cyclopaedia of Practical Receipts 6th ed. (1880), p.761 (image 774):

FRANKINCENSE. Syn. Common frankincense; Thus (Ph. L.), L. The turpentine which exudes from the bark of Abies excelsa (Norway spruce fir) and Pinus palustris (pitch or swamp pine), hardened by the air. (Ph. L.) The gum-resin olibanum, which is the produce of the Boswellia thurifera, is the 'odorous frankincense' of commerce.

I don't know how to reconcile this with the current article. Hv (talk) 15:32, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

The chemical components in Frankincense oil[edit]

Would like to add the following to the Frankincense Essential Oil section because of recent misinformation on the internet claiming boswellic acid in the steam distilled essential oil:

"Contrary to recent claims by certain companies, steam or hydro distilled frankincense oil does not contain any boswellic acid as these components are non-volatile and too large to come over in the steam distillation process. The chemistry of the essential oil is mainly monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes."

Here is a typical analysis of Indian frankincense essential oil, Boswellia serrata [Flav. Fragr. J., Vol. 2, (3), 99-102 (1987)] , one the the species claimed to have high boswellic acid in the essential oil:


alpha-Thujene 61.36 alpha-Pinene 7.73 Sabinene 5.07 para-Cymene 4.28 Methyl chavicol 2.74 alpha-Phellandrene 2.22 alpha-Thujone 1.76 Limonene 1.55 beta-Bourbonene 1.49 beta-Thujone 1.40 delta-3-Carene 1.12 Zingiberene 1.01 alpha-Terpineol 0.55 Terpinen-4-ol 0.45 alpha-Terpinene 0.41 Elemicin 0.37 Methyl eugenol 0.33 beta-Pinene 0.21 Linalool 0.19 gamma-Terpinene 0.15 Camphor 0.04 Camphene 0.04 beta-Phellandrene 0.03 Tricyclene 0.02 Citronellol 0.01 Fenchone 0.01 Menthone 0.01 Isomenthone 0.01


I am an essential oil chemist and have thousands of essential oils over the last two decades and there has never been a case of a steam distilled essential oil containing a triterpenoid compound like boswellic acid, its just not physically possible. Here are my credentials with some of my published work for your review: http://essentialoils.org/about/dr-p — Preceding unsigned comment added by Eodoctor (talkcontribs) 04:05, 17 May 2012 (UTC)

I would trim to ""Contrary to recent claims, steam or hydro distilled frankincense oil does not contain any boswellic acid as these components are non-volatile and too large to come over in the steam distillation process. The chemistry of the essential oil is mainly monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes." and use the source provided above. Any objections to this edit? --NeilN talk to me 14:25, 17 May 2012 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

The article contradicts itself on the etymology of the word "frankincense". The article says in the intro "The English word is derived from old French 'franc encens' (i.e. pure incense)" but then later says "Frankincense was reintroduced to Europe by Frankish Crusaders (Frank-incense)". Which one is it? Jrdx (talk) 01:54, 17 December 2012 (UTC)